Evaluation of natural and synthetic preemergence herbicides used in ornamental landscapes Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/qn59q6778

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  • A series of field experiments conducted at the Lewis-Brown horticulture farm at Oregon State University evaluated the performance of four preemergence herbicides in simulated ornamental shrub beds. Two natural products, corn gluten meal (CGM) and meadowfoam seedmeal (MFS), were used along with two synthetic products, prodiamine purchased under the trade name Barricade® 65WG herbicide and Team 2G herbicide containing active ingredients trifluralin and benefin. The efficacy of these products was evaluated on four weed species commonly found in the Willamette Valley of Oregon, Digitaria sanguinalis (crabgrass), Poa annua (annual bluegrass), Senecio vulgaris (common groundsel) and Medicago lupulina (black medic). The objective of this research was to determine if these natural products could be used as effectively as their synthetic counterparts to control weeds. Throughout each field experiment, CGM and MFS provided poor weed control results, and performance of the synthetic herbicides was superior to the natural products. Following each respective manufacturer's label recommendations, prodiamine and trifluralin + benefin provided acceptable to excellent preemergence control of all weed species screened with the exception of Senecio vulgaris. MFS provided temporary control of the two broadleaf weeds, but did not prevent either grass species from emerging and establishing. At this time MFS is not a commercially available product, and this research found MFS to be unreliable and impractical for use as a preemergence herbicide in ornamental landscapes. CGM was ineffective against all four weeds even at rates twice the maximum recommended label rate. Following CGM's unsatisfactory performance in four field experiments, further research examining growth and development of Digitaria sanguinalis seedlings treated with CGM at the time of planting was conducted in a series of greenhouse experiments. Root length measurements were documented 28 days after treatment (DAT). Foliage was removed 28 DAT, dried for 14 days and weighed. In these greenhouse experiments Digitaria sanguinalis increased in both foliar dry weight and root length when comparing CGM treatments to the control. Root length and foliar dry weight increased as CGM rates increased. CGM failed to control Digitaria sanguinalis even at rates of up to nine times the maximum recommended label rate.
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