Object Tracking-by-Segmentation in Videos Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/qv33s002p

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  • This thesis focuses on the problem of object tracking. Given a video, the general objective of tracking is to track the location over time of one or more targets in the image sequence. This is a very challenging task as algorithms need to deal with problems such as appearance variations, non-rigid deformations, cluttered background, occlusions etc. While most existing methods use bounding boxes to represent the target, we use segmentations instead, which provide better ac- cess to target pixels and can better handle occlusions. Our first contribution, is a new tracking algorithm that given an over-segmentation of a video tracks multiple targets through interactions and occlusions. We develop a provably convergent learning algorithm for this approach, which leverages training data to improve performance. Our second contribution targets the case when an over-segmentation is not available due to poor video quality or low resolution. For this case, we develop a new algorithm that tracks coherent regions and estimates the number of target objects in each region. This count representation of a video can be used to help inform more traditional tracking techniques. Finally, we develop the first tracking-by-segmentation approach based on deep learning. We propose a novel deep network architecture and training algorithms for learning to segment and track a target object throughout a video. All of our algorithms are rigorously evaluated on challenging benchmark video collections, which demonstrate improvements over the state-of-the-art.
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  • description.provenance : Submitted by Sheng Chen (chens3@oregonstate.edu) on 2017-03-07T21:24:30Z No. of bitstreams: 2 license_rdf: 1370 bytes, checksum: cd1af5ab51bcc7a5280cf305303530e9 (MD5) thesis_Sheng_Chen.pdf: 2994703 bytes, checksum: 41c76b07c7107951763519667f61f093 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2017-03-09T17:52:49Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 2 license_rdf: 1370 bytes, checksum: cd1af5ab51bcc7a5280cf305303530e9 (MD5) thesis_Sheng_Chen.pdf: 2994703 bytes, checksum: 41c76b07c7107951763519667f61f093 (MD5) Previous issue date: 2017-03-07
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Laura Wilson(laura.wilson@oregonstate.edu) on 2017-03-09T17:52:49Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 2 license_rdf: 1370 bytes, checksum: cd1af5ab51bcc7a5280cf305303530e9 (MD5) thesis_Sheng_Chen.pdf: 2994703 bytes, checksum: 41c76b07c7107951763519667f61f093 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Julie Kurtz(julie.kurtz@oregonstate.edu) on 2017-03-08T19:59:46Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 2 license_rdf: 1370 bytes, checksum: cd1af5ab51bcc7a5280cf305303530e9 (MD5) thesis_Sheng_Chen.pdf: 2994703 bytes, checksum: 41c76b07c7107951763519667f61f093 (MD5)

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