The effect of running speed and turning direction on lower extremity joint moment Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/qz20sv61q

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  • Fast medio-lateral movements, frequent in a number of sports activities, are associated with lower extremity injuries. These injuries may occur as a result of excessive musculoskeletal stresses on the joints and their associate structures. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of running speed and turning movement on the three-dimensional moments at the ankle, knee, and hip joints. Data were collected using video cameras and force plate. Eight male recreational basketball players were tested during slow (1.5 m/s), moderate (3.0 m/s), and fast running (4.5 m/s) and when cutting to the right or left (+60, +30, 0, -30, and -60°). The inverse dynamics approach was used to integrate the body segment parameter, kinematic and force plate data, and to solve the resultant joint moments. At the ankle joint, inversion/eversion, dorsi/plantar flexion, and internal/external rotation moments of the ankle joint increased with running speed (p<.05). At the knee joint, flexion/extension and abduction/adduction moments increased with running speed except flexion moment that decreased with running speed (p<.05). At the hip joint, internal/external rotation, flexion/extension, and abduction/adduction moments increased with running speed (p<.05). In medial cutting movements, greater abduction moments of the ankle, adduction moments of the knee and external rotation and adduction of the hip were found (p<.05). In lateral cutting movements, greater inversion and adduction moments of the ankle, abduction moments of the knee and hip were found (p<.05). These findings reinforce the intuitive notion that fast medio-lateral turning movements produce substantially greater musculoskeletal loading on the joint structures than does straight running and consequently have greater potential for inducing lower extremity injuries such as ankle sprain or anterior cruciate ligament injury.
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  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2012-09-14T20:04:48Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 LeeKi-Kwang1999.pdf: 4481176 bytes, checksum: fa431cee3d9c25d0a5503efbf6b0f173 (MD5) Previous issue date: 1998-11-19
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  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2012-09-14T20:04:48Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 LeeKi-Kwang1999.pdf: 4481176 bytes, checksum: fa431cee3d9c25d0a5503efbf6b0f173 (MD5)

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