Predicting Aerodynamic Loads on Highly Flexible Membrane Wings Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/r207tr76w

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract or Summary
  • Through passive adaptation to incidental flow, flexible aerodynamic surfaces exploit effects of increased lift, delayed stall and disturbance rejection. Wings of birds, bats, and insects exhibit these passive effects, and at the same time through the use of structural state feedback sensed from the loads on the wing, active control is applied to achieve stable and highly dynamic maneuvers. The goal of this research is to predict aerodynamic loads on flexible wings, by sensing their structural responses to static and dynamic airflow conditions. Three approaches are presented to estimate aerodynamic loads on highly flexible membrane wings, under static and dynamic conditions, at low Reynolds number. The first applies a linear membrane formulation to correlate the wing's structural strain to lift, through wing-tip vorticity. In the second, the Poisson equation for a 2D linear-elastic membrane with out-of-plane deformation was used to calculate normal pressure distribution from virtual strain sensors using proper orthogonal decomposition basis functions and a recursive least squares minimization. Finally, potential flow theory and a first order state space representation is applied to the transient flow effects around a pitching membrane airfoil to model the time varying loads due to dynamic pitching.
Resource Type
Date Available
Date Copyright
Date Issued
Degree Level
Degree Name
Degree Field
Degree Grantor
Commencement Year
Advisor
Committee Member
Academic Affiliation
Non-Academic Affiliation
Keyword
Subject
Rights Statement
Publisher
Peer Reviewed
Language
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Trenton Carpenter (carpentr@onid.orst.edu) on 2015-07-08T16:03:08Z No. of bitstreams: 2 license_rdf: 1370 bytes, checksum: cd1af5ab51bcc7a5280cf305303530e9 (MD5) PhD_Carpenter_07082015_final.pdf: 6355154 bytes, checksum: d969c8fdb2c26abcc11684b75e0ed953 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2015-07-09T20:54:40Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 2 license_rdf: 1370 bytes, checksum: cd1af5ab51bcc7a5280cf305303530e9 (MD5) PhD_Carpenter_07082015_final.pdf: 6355154 bytes, checksum: d969c8fdb2c26abcc11684b75e0ed953 (MD5) Previous issue date: 2015-06-04
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Laura Wilson(laura.wilson@oregonstate.edu) on 2015-07-09T20:54:40Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 2 license_rdf: 1370 bytes, checksum: cd1af5ab51bcc7a5280cf305303530e9 (MD5) PhD_Carpenter_07082015_final.pdf: 6355154 bytes, checksum: d969c8fdb2c26abcc11684b75e0ed953 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Julie Kurtz(julie.kurtz@oregonstate.edu) on 2015-07-09T20:39:08Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 2 license_rdf: 1370 bytes, checksum: cd1af5ab51bcc7a5280cf305303530e9 (MD5) PhD_Carpenter_07082015_final.pdf: 6355154 bytes, checksum: d969c8fdb2c26abcc11684b75e0ed953 (MD5)

Relationships

Parents:

This work has no parents.

Last modified

Downloadable Content

Download PDF

Items