The effect of surface type on plantar pressure distribution and running kinematics Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/r207ts895

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract or Summary
  • The purpose of this study was to examine pressure at five selected sites on the plantar surface of the foot and adaptations in running kinematics among fourteen male varsity collegiate distance runners on five different surfaces--asphalt, cinders, concrete, grass, and tartan. Pressure data were collected with an Electrodynogram system (EDG) and kinematic data were collected with a Redlake LOCAM 16mm high-speed camera operating at 100 fps. Repeated measures ANOVA was utilized to evaluate differences (p<0.10) among the variables. Pressure at the fifth metatarsal site on the left foot was found to be higher on the harder surfaces--asphalt, concrete, and tartan--than on the softer surfaces--grass and cinders. Higher pressures were found, in general, on the metatarsal region of the foot as opposed to the calcaneal region, especially while running on the harder surfaces. This finding may suggest that adequate shock absorption occurs in the calcaneal region of the shoe used in this study, and/or the metatarsal region of the foot-shoe interface may merit more attention than is commonly thought. This contention is substantiated by the research of Cavanagh & LaFortune (1980). Among the kinematic variables quantified--stride length, stride rate, single leg support time, and swing time--only stride rate varied with surfaces. Stride rate was found to be slightly, but significantly (p<0.10) slower on concrete and asphalt than on the softer surfaces. The differences observed may be representative of a tendency of runners to slow down on concrete and therefore attenuate as much force as possible. This contention is substantiated by the research of Feehery (1986) and Nigg (1985). The other three kinematic variables were relatively unaffected by differences in the running surfaces investigated. The results of this study indicate that the underlying mechanisms and adaptations to running on different surface types are extremely complex phenomena which merit further investigation before physical educators and coaches can be provided with firm guidelines for appropriate running surface(s) for students and athletes.
Resource Type
Date Available
Date Copyright
Date Issued
Degree Level
Degree Name
Degree Field
Degree Grantor
Commencement Year
Advisor
Committee Member
Academic Affiliation
Non-Academic Affiliation
Subject
Rights Statement
Peer Reviewed
Language
Digitization Specifications
  • File scanned at 300 ppi (Monochrome) using Capture Perfect 3.0.82 on a Canon DR-9080C in PDF format. CVista PdfCompressor 4.0 was used for pdf compression and textual OCR.
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2013-06-11T16:17:25Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 KillgoreGarryL1989.pdf: 1543596 bytes, checksum: 405c28a72dfc3d73b1f905c88ba7e35f (MD5) Previous issue date: 1989-02-22
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-05-29T18:18:42Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 KillgoreGarryL1989.pdf: 1543596 bytes, checksum: 405c28a72dfc3d73b1f905c88ba7e35f (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Kim Stowell (ksscannerosu@gmail.com) on 2013-05-22T21:27:34Z No. of bitstreams: 1 KillgoreGarryL1989.pdf: 1543596 bytes, checksum: 405c28a72dfc3d73b1f905c88ba7e35f (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Deborah Campbell(deborah.campbell@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-06-11T16:17:24Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 KillgoreGarryL1989.pdf: 1543596 bytes, checksum: 405c28a72dfc3d73b1f905c88ba7e35f (MD5)

Relationships

In Administrative Set:
Last modified: 08/22/2017

Downloadable Content

Download PDF
Citations:

EndNote | Zotero | Mendeley

Items