The influence of work values in the life planning of tenth grade girls Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/r494vn81z

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  • This investigation was concerned with the work values of tenth grade girls and their relationship to the girls' aspirations and expectations for future education and marriage-career roles. The instrument employed for the value measurement was the Work Values Inventory of Super (1968). An original questionnaire was developed by the researcher to determine the subject's age, her aspirations and expectations, and the occupational status of both parents. Nine authorities composing a committee of judges reviewed the questionnaire for its technical aspects and passed upon the ability of this age group to understand the questions as worded. The Work Values Inventory and questionnaire then were pretested. After some revision of the questionnaire, both instruments were administered to 503 tenth grade girls within five randomly selected Oregon high schools. Usable responses were provided by 488 subjects. The conclusions that may be drawn from the descriptive and statistical treatment of the data are as follows: 1. Consistent with Super's (1970) report, the work values most important to girls of this grade level are Way of Life and Altruism. Values least emphasized are Management and Esthetics. 2. Some further education or training beyond high school is the wish of about two-thirds of the girls though the expectation of a slightly smaller percentage. Approximately three-fourths want to delay marriage a year or two after high school graduation in order to obtain such education or in order to be gainfully employed for this time. A slightly greater percentage expect to delay marriage for these reasons. Slightly over 90 percent wish to marry and plan to do so. All but about seven percent want and expect to have children, about half of the group desiring two children and anticipating that they will bear this number. In regard to future work outside of the home, almost 50 percent want to enter occupations in the professional-technical category and slightly over one-third anticipate that they will. The occupations of teacher and nurse account for about 20 percent of all desired occupations and only a slightly smaller percentage of those the girls expect to enter. Secretary is the single occupational title most often mentioned among either aspirations or expectations. Over 95 percent of the girls both want and expect to work outside of the home in the future, about 40 percent wishing to integrate such work with marriage and child-rearing responsibilities in a discontinuous work pattern and about an equal percentage planning to do so. 3. Results of analysis of variance indicate that scores for individual work values differ significantly (p < . 05) among girls who differ in regard to achievement-test scores, the fathers' current employment or unemployment, socioeconomic levels of the fathers' occupations; and either aspirations or expectations regarding future education, time of marriage, child-bearing, work outside of the home, and the integration of marriage and career roles. Individual work-value scores do not differ significantly among girls who differ in regard to age, IQ scores, mothers' employment or unemployment, or socioeconomic levels of the mothers' occupations. 4. Despite significant differences in the scores of individual work values among sub-groups examined, the calculation of Kendall's Coefficient of Concordance (W) revealed a high degree of overall consistency (p < .01) in the work-value hierarchies of girls who differ in regard to age, intelligence or scholastic achievement, parents' employment and the socioeconomic levels of their occupations, and any aspirations or expectations considered. Values ranked as most important or least important by girls of the total sample remain so for those within most sub-groups. 5. Also reported are any relationship of the girls' aspirations and expectations to their age, intelligence or scholastic achievement, parents' current employment and socioeconomic levels of the parents' occupations.
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