Graduate Thesis Or Dissertation

 

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https://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/r494vq51n

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  • Many educators are currently revising their curricula to include critical thinking. However, there are factors which apparently allow some students to become better critical thinkers than others. Such factors are the concern of two mentors of this researcher: Ron Manuto and Lloyd Crisp. Both the Manuto and Crisp (1987) and the Crisp and Manuto (1987) studies inquired into possible characteristics relating to critical thinking, as measured by the Watson- Glaser Critical Thinking Test, form A (1980): dogmatism, self-distortion, gender, age, and academic major. The first hypothesis of this study predicted that there was an inverse relationship between dogmatism and critical thinking, a hypothesis supported in the Manuto-Crisp (1987) study. The second hypothesis predicted that males would score higher on the Cornell Critical Thinking Test (1985) than would females. Crisp and Manuto found that males scored significantly higher on the Watson-Glaser Critical Thinking Test than did females. An aim of this study was to determine whether the use of different critical thinking measures would generate different findings. The final area of investigation of this study was a research question: Do females and males score differently on dogmatism? The first hypothesis of this study predicted that there would be an inverse relationship between critical thinking and dogmatism and was supported by the findings. The critical thinking and dogmatism findings of this study were very similar to the results of the Manuto-Crisp (1987) study indicating that the two different critical thinking measures apparently do not generate different results when relative to Rokeach's Dogmatism Scale. The second hypothesis of this study was that males would score higher on the Cornell Critical Thinking Test than would females was not supported by the findings. Males scored higher than females, as predicted, however not significantly higher. Finally, the findings of this study indicated that males scored significantly higher than females on Rokeach's Dogmatism Scale.
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  • Appendix A removed due to copyright.
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-06-17T21:46:07Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1McKeeMollieA1990.pdf: 725847 bytes, checksum: 0672afcf43257b7cebd811174db81fd4 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Kim Stowell (ksscannerosu@gmail.com) on 2013-05-08T19:36:06ZNo. of bitstreams: 1McKeeMollieA1990.pdf: 725847 bytes, checksum: 0672afcf43257b7cebd811174db81fd4 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-05-08T20:57:41Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1McKeeMollieA1990.pdf: 725847 bytes, checksum: 0672afcf43257b7cebd811174db81fd4 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2013-06-17T21:46:07Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1McKeeMollieA1990.pdf: 725847 bytes, checksum: 0672afcf43257b7cebd811174db81fd4 (MD5) Previous issue date: 1990-05-04

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