Toward wave energy in Oregon : predicting wave conditions and extracted power Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/r781wj043

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract or Summary
  • Knowledge of wave conditions in nearshore regions supports the development of ocean wave energy technology by providing wave climatology for device design considerations, and power output estimates. By modeling wave transformation over the continental shelf, wave conditions were predicted in nearshore regions where potential wave energy conversion sites are located. Subsequently, a wave-structure interaction model was implemented, and power output estimates were made for a simplified wave energy converter operating in measured spectral wave conditions. For the purpose of modeling wave transformation, the SWAN spectral wave model was applied to three domains on Oregon's continental shelf. The purpose was to assess the skill of the SWAN model in this application (highly energetic waves on a narrow continental shelf). By comparing results with in situ data collected near the coast, it was found that the model had substantial skill, predicting in situ wave heights with RMS percent errors of 11%. The characterization of the transformation across the shelf was not improved by including bottom friction and wind wave generation, suggesting that these physical processes are not important for a model of Oregon's continental shelf considering depths less than 150m. When basin scale wave model output was used to force the outer shelf boundary, the model remained skillful, with RMS percent errors of 17-20%. In order to estimate power output from a wave energy converter, device response to hydrodynamic forces was computed using the WAMIT boundary element method, potential ow model. A method was outlined for using the hydrodynamic response to estimate power output. This method was demonstrated by considering an idealized non-resonating wave energy converter with one year of measured spectral wave conditions from the Oregon coast. The power calculation was performed in the frequency domain, with a passive tuning system which was tuned at time scales ranging from hourly to annually. It was found that there was only a 3.2% gain in productivity by tuning hourly over tuning annually, suggesting that for a non-resonating wave energy converter, power output is not very sensitive to power take off damping. Interaction between wave energy converters in arrays was considered also, along with a discussion of associated limitations of multiple body interaction analysis within WAMIT.
Resource Type
Date Available
Date Copyright
Date Issued
Degree Level
Degree Name
Degree Field
Degree Grantor
Commencement Year
Advisor
Committee Member
Academic Affiliation
Non-Academic Affiliation
Keyword
Subject
Rights Statement
Publisher
Language
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2011-06-15T22:36:33Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 OskampJeffreyA2011.pdf: 1851204 bytes, checksum: 54100f7222ede6c278a794f63368f1c2 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Jeffrey Oskamp (oskampj@onid.orst.edu) on 2011-06-10T17:49:19Z No. of bitstreams: 1 OskampJeffreyA2011.pdf: 1851204 bytes, checksum: 54100f7222ede6c278a794f63368f1c2 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Laura Wilson(laura.wilson@oregonstate.edu) on 2011-06-15T22:36:33Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 OskampJeffreyA2011.pdf: 1851204 bytes, checksum: 54100f7222ede6c278a794f63368f1c2 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Julie Kurtz(julie.kurtz@oregonstate.edu) on 2011-06-15T18:23:18Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 OskampJeffreyA2011.pdf: 1851204 bytes, checksum: 54100f7222ede6c278a794f63368f1c2 (MD5)

Relationships

Parents:

This work has no parents.

Last modified

Downloadable Content

Download PDF

Items