Relationships of self-directive group play, self-concept and social behavior in first grade children Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/rn301508s

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  • The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between self-directive play and social behavior and between self-directive play and self-concept in matched pairs of first grade children. The sample consisted of 12 pairs of first grade children matched for sex, age, school experience, and number of siblings. The 24 subjects were equally divided using a lottery method into one control and one experimental group. The experimental subjects were then randomly divided into two self-directive play groups, which met for 30 minutes twice a week for seven weeks. A female counselor met with experimental play Group I and a male counselor met with play Group II. The control group received no special attention other than pre- and post-observations and testing. Data for hypotheses one, two and three were collected by four trained observers using a time-event observation strategy. The social behaviors were recorded on the Social Behavior Scale (SBS). The children were observed in the classroom and on the playground prior to the beginning of the research and at the conclusion of the project. Data for hypothesis four were collected utilizing the Self-concept Scale of the Self-Concept and Motivation Inventory (SCAMIN). The SCAMIN was administered to the subjects prior to the beginning of the research and at the conclusion of the project. Specific hypotheses examined were: 1. There is no significant difference between the control and experimental groups' mean gain score on autonomous behavior as measured by the Social Behavior Scale. 2. There is no significant difference between the control and experimental groups' mean gain score on acceptance by peers as measured by the Social Behavior Scale. 3. There is no significant difference between the control and experimental groups' mean gain score on constructive behavior as measured by the Social Behavior Scale. 4. There is no significant difference between the control and experimental groups' mean gain score on self-concept as measured by the self-concept scale on the Self-concept and Motivation Inventory (SCAMIN). A one-way analysis of covariance using the pre-test scores as the covariate was utilized in testing the four hypotheses. The .05 level of significance was chosen for testing the hypotheses. The results yielded a significant difference at the .05 level on hypothesis two in favor of the experimental group. The results of the analysis did not yield a significant difference at the .05 level for hypotheses one, three, and four. However, on analyzing the two elements (self-adequacy and role-expectations) of the self-concept score, the results yielded a significant difference at the .05 level on self-adequacy. Using the same analysis procedure, the data were subjected to an exploratory analysis to determine if the sex of the subjects or the sex of the counselor had any significant effect on the mean gain scores. The .10 level on the exploratory analysis were reported for the benefit of the reader. The results of the exploratory analysis yielded a significant difference at the .05 level on self-adequacy between the experimental and control girls' mean gain score and between the experimental and control boys' mean gain scores in favor of the experimental subjects. No significant differences were found when the male and female counselors' experimental girls' mean gain scores were compared. When the male and female counselors' experimental boys' mean gain scores were compared the results of the analysis yielded a significant difference at the .10 level on autonomous behavior and acceptance by peers. No significant differences (P < .05) were found between the female and male counselors' experimental subjects (female and male) on the mean gain scores on autonomous behavior, acceptance by peers, constructive behavior, self-adequacy, role-expectations, and self-concept using the analysis of variance.
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  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2014-01-15T17:23:25Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 BradenGary1973.pdf: 666605 bytes, checksum: ffbc82271d33c7f24bac2d153b6753d1 (MD5) Previous issue date: 1972-07-25
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