Persistence and age-age genetic correlations of stem defects in Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/rr1720893

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract or Summary
  • Stem defects, including sinuosity, large branches, and the occurrence of steep-angled branches (e.g., forks and ramicorns) can occur with high frequency in young plantations of Coastal Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii (Mirb.) Franco). The importance of including these stem defects as criteria in early selection depends, in great part, on their persistence over time, and the efficiency of early selection for these traits. In this study, 90 open-pollinated families of Douglas-fir growing on three test sites in the Oregon Coast Range, and originally measured in 1984 at age 12, were remeasured in 1996, at age 24 (approximate mid-rotation age for managed plantations in this region). While the majority (62%) of trees scored as having ramicoms at age 12 still had them at age 24, most forks (53%) had become ramicorns by the second measurement. Thus, there does not seem to be a need to score forks and ramicorns separately. Although branch size was highly correlated between the two measurement dates, sinuosity scores were poorly correlated. Estimated heritabilities and genetic correlations between stem defect traits, and between stem defect traits and bole diameter at breast height (DBH), were similar at the two ages. Due to low heritabilities, estimated genetic gains for DBH and individual stem defect traits were low but consistent with earlier studies. Both branch size and the number of whorls with steep-angled branches had positive genetic correlations with DBH, indicating that selection for stem size alone will indirectly increase stem defects. Thus, it may be prudent to include these traits along with DBH as selection criteria. Sinuosity was nearly uncorrelated with DBH. With the exception of sinuosity, genetic correlations between comparable traits at the two ages were very high (>0.75), and predicted correlated responses in these traits at age 24, from selection at age 12, were nearly as great as those expected if selection was delayed until age 24.
Resource Type
Date Available
Date Issued
Degree Level
Degree Name
Degree Field
Degree Grantor
Commencement Year
Advisor
Academic Affiliation
Non-Academic Affiliation
Subject
Rights Statement
Language
Digitization Specifications
  • PDF derivative scanned at 300 ppi (256 B&W, 256 Grayscale), using Capture Perfect 3.0.82, on a Canon DR-9080C. CVista PdfCompressor 4.0 was used for pdf compression and textual OCR.
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Digital Production (digitalproduc@gmail.com) on 2009-12-16T23:00:46Z No. of bitstreams: 1 TemelFatih1997.pdf: 832554 bytes, checksum: a58be0bbd3a3c95a4ca3c4e8b2dfba71 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2009-12-17T17:36:15Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 TemelFatih1997.pdf: 832554 bytes, checksum: a58be0bbd3a3c95a4ca3c4e8b2dfba71 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2009-12-17T17:36:15Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 TemelFatih1997.pdf: 832554 bytes, checksum: a58be0bbd3a3c95a4ca3c4e8b2dfba71 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2009-12-17T17:33:19Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 TemelFatih1997.pdf: 832554 bytes, checksum: a58be0bbd3a3c95a4ca3c4e8b2dfba71 (MD5)

Relationships

Parents:

This work has no parents.

Last modified

Downloadable Content

Download PDF

Items