Factors predicting sixth-grade teachers' implementation of HIV/AIDS education Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/rr1721457

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  • The death toll from AIDS continues to rise in the United States. As of May 1, 1995, 441,528 cases of AIDS had been recorded in the U. S. One of the most powerful ways to control the spread of this disease is prevention education. In 1988, Oregon passed OAR 581-22-412 requiring implementation of HIV/AIDS education as a part of a comprehensive health education program throughout grade levels K-12. The Oregon Department of Education and the Oregon Health Division produced a curriculum and implemented a statewide inservice program in 1988. There has been no uniform statewide training since then, nor have implementation practices been monitored consistently. Sixth grade is a pivotal time in childhood when children are passing through puberty into adolescence. Sixth grade may be placed in a middle school with a health specialist, or in an elementary school with no health teacher. This grade may be the final opportunity for intervening before students adopt behavior patterns which may lead to HIV/AIDS. The purposes for this study were twofold. The first was to determine the extent to which Oregon sixth-grade teachers were implementing HIV/AIDS education. The second was to discover what factors might predict whether a sixth-grade teacher would be an implementer. A random stratified sample of 400 was drawn from the population of 1,333 sixth-grade teachers employed during 1993-1994. These teachers received a written questionnaire. Three-hundred and six teachers returned surveys. One-hundred and twenty of the subjects met the definition for implementer and 48 were determined to be non-implementers. The remaining 138 did not supply enough information to be categorized but their responses were used where applicable. Null hypotheses were tested using the chi-square and Mann-Whitney U statistics. Significant factors were whether teachers had some training and having had training in characteristics of HIV infection, low-risk behaviors leading to HIV infection, prevention behaviors, infection control, and social implications of AIDS. Regression analysis was employed to determine factors which predict that a teacher will be an implementer. Significant factors were a) having had inservice in low-risk behaviors, b) teaching in a self-contained classroom, c) and not defining oneself as politically conservative.
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