Evaluation of color change in textiles by middle-aged women Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/rv042x18d

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract or Summary
  • The purpose of this study was to assess reactions to and opinions about color and color performance by women ages 45 to 54 years. Hypotheses were developed to test relationships and differences between both perception and acceptance of color change and: 1) the three primary colors, 2) the two methods of sample presentation, 3) order in presentation of the single color level 5, and 4) how well the color was liked. Liking of the color of the original sample was compared to that of the faded samples. Average levels of acceptance were compared to the L22 and Celanese performance standards. Interviews with 152 subjects were conducted under controlled conditions. Subjects were first shown single and then paired fabric samples. The samples used consisted of three intensely colored fabrics, red, blue, and yellow, with each color faded to five different levels according to the Gray Scale. While viewing the samples, the subjects answered several questions concerning perception of color changes, wearing garments of that color in public, and how well the color was liked. In comparing the percentages of perception and acceptance of color change, diverse differences for the three colors were evident. Thus, it was considered inappropriate to make comparisons among the three colors. The percentage of subjects perceiving color change generally varied directly with the amount of color change for all three colors. The acceptance of color change in red varied inversely with the amount of color change. Irregular results occurred in acceptance of yellow for the single presentation, but acceptance generally varied inversely with the amount of color change in the paired pre sentation. A significant number of subjects identified color differences in each color at level 5, where no difference actually existed. More subjects identified color differences at this level in the single presentation than in the paired. The two methods of sample presentation, single and paired frames, differed significantly for both perception and acceptance. There was a higher percentage of perception at all faded levels for the paired presentation, but the degree of acceptance tended to be higher for the single presentation. The order in which the level 5 sample was presented was found to have no significant effect on either perception or acceptance of color change in all colors. Subjects who clearly liked a color differed from those who disliked it in the perception of color change only for the upper levels of red and level 3. 5 of blue in the single presentation. The acceptance of color change as related to the degree a color was liked varied with the color and color level. The acceptance of color change was found to be similar for both ways it was assessed: 1) the amount of color change (nonmatching) and 2) harmonious blending. Levels of acceptance were compared to those standards established by Celanese and the USA Performance Requirements, L22, and both generally appeared to be minimal when the responses of 75 percent of these subjects who identified color change were considered. Mean scores of color preference indicated that for blue and red, the colors of the original samples were preferred to most of the faded samples, but just the opposite was true for yellow. Overall, blue was rated the highest in preference of the three colors, with red second, and yellow last.
Resource Type
Date Available
Date Copyright
Date Issued
Degree Level
Degree Name
Degree Field
Degree Grantor
Commencement Year
Advisor
Academic Affiliation
Non-Academic Affiliation
Subject
Rights Statement
Peer Reviewed
Language
Digitization Specifications
  • File scanned at 300 ppi (Monochrome, 24-bit Color) using ScandAll PRO 1.8.1 on a Fi-6770A in PDF format. CVista PdfCompressor 5.0 was used for pdf compression and textual OCR.
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Deborah Campbell(deborah.campbell@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-10-31T15:11:09Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 HandorfLindaL1976.pdf: 1043387 bytes, checksum: e16bd7e93802fc13eef397f99cd9bd93 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-10-30T15:12:06Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 HandorfLindaL1976.pdf: 1043387 bytes, checksum: e16bd7e93802fc13eef397f99cd9bd93 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Madison Medley (mmscannerosu@gmail.com) on 2013-10-29T19:30:58Z No. of bitstreams: 1 HandorfLindaL1976.pdf: 1043387 bytes, checksum: e16bd7e93802fc13eef397f99cd9bd93 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2013-10-31T15:11:09Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 HandorfLindaL1976.pdf: 1043387 bytes, checksum: e16bd7e93802fc13eef397f99cd9bd93 (MD5) Previous issue date: 1975-06-12

Relationships

Parents:

This work has no parents.

Last modified

Downloadable Content

Download PDF

Items