Susceptibility of peas to aphid inoculation with bean yellow mosaic virus Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/s1784p80f

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  • The effects of soil moisture, mineral nutrition and temperature on the susceptibility of peas to inoculation with bean yellow mosaic virus (BYMV) by the green peach aphid, Myzus persicae (Sulz.) were investigated along with three vector-virus relationships. In addition, a comparative study was made of two methods of evaluating susceptibility of slants to inoculation with virus by aphids. A more accurate method of estimating plant susceptibility to inoculation with virus by aphids is proposed. With this method, the aphid is allowed to probe only once on a test plant rather than spending; its entire infective feeding period on the plant. There was no statistically significant difference between the susceptibility of plants grown in very moist soil and the susceptibility of plants grown in very dry soil even though the plants in the dry soil were strikingly dwarfed. Additions of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium to the soil at the time of planting had no effect on the susceptibility of Lincoln and Perfected Wales peas to inoculation with BYMV by aphids even though these treatments resulted in large increases in the amounts of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium in the soil and plants. The addition of calcium, copper, iron, magnesium, manganese and zinc chelates to the soil had no effect on the susceptibility of Lincoln peas to inoculation with BYMV by aphids. There was an increase in susceptibility of Lincoln peas to inoculation with BYMV by aphids with decrease in preinoculation temperature over a range of 15° to 36° C. Regression analysis indicated the increase was linear and amounted to approximately a six percent increase in susceptibility for each degree centigrade decrease in temperature. Plants grown at postinoculation temperatures below 24° were less susceptible than plants grown at 246. Plant susceptibility was greater at a postinoculation temperature of 30° than at 24°. Initial work indicated the effects of preinoculation and postinoculation temperatures were not additive. No significant differences in virus transmission were found for aphids with acquisition probes in the 11- to 45-second range. Increase in test probe time resulted in increase in virus transmission over a 6- to 60-second range, the major increase occurring after 35 seconds. In an experiment on the retention of BYMV by feeding aphids, the transmission decreased from an initial level of 74% to 4% after a 15-minute feeding.
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