The successful teacher in technical education : the preparation of the successful teacher Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/s1784q12h

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  • The purpose of this study was to assist the development of an improved technical teacher education program. Specifically, the project sought to determine what, if any, factors in the backgrounds of successful technical teachers may have accounted for their success in teaching. To provide information to this end, the investigation sought answers to the following questions: 1. What is the family status of successful technical teachers? 2. What is the nature of the successful technical teacher's industrial experience? 3. Is there a definite educational background pattern that characterizes the successful technical teacher? 4. Do the teaching loads of the successful teachers differ from those of the less successful instructors? 5. Do high success teachers receive higher salaries than do low success teachers? 6. Does the successful technical teacher belong to community and professional organizations? 7. Are successful technical teachers interested in art, music, literature, and social sciences? 8. Do successful technical instructors agree in their curriculum recommendations for technical teacher education? Procedures: Directors of technical education in 354 post-secondary institutions in 44 states and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, were requested to evaluate each of their full-time technical instructors, having a minimum of two years of teaching experience. The 354 schools represented all of the institutions in the United States and its territories, conducting full-time, post- secondary, technical education programs in 1963 under Title VIII of the National Defense Education Act. The evaluation instrument was based upon staff evaluation forms currently used in most large school systems. The participants in the study were selected on the basis of their evaluation scores. The instructors with high scores (top 22 percent) constituted the high success group, while the low rated instructors (bottom 22 percent) served as the low success group. Technical instructors in both groups were contacted by mail. They were requested to complete a comprehensive questionnaire dealing with four distinct categories; educational background, current teaching activities, interests, and recommendations for a technical teacher education curriculum. The questionnaire returns were tabulated by the Oregon State University Computer Center. The mean responses of the two groups to each of the questions were compared and analyzed. Responses that indicated significant differences between the two groups were further studied and evaluated. A summary of the findings is herewith reported. Selected Findings: 1. The high success instructors generally attended state universities while the low success group was more likely product of other 4-year institutions. 2. The high success teachers had more advanced degrees in Education among them than there were among the low success group. 3. The average high success instructor had more students in his classes than the low success teacher. 4. The average high success instructor earned $2,636 more per year than the low success teacher. 5. The average low success instructor had 1.2 years more teaching experience than the high success teacher. 6. The average low success instructor had 4.1 years more industrial experience than the high success teacher. 7. No significant difference was found between the two groups as to completed teacher education course work or inservice preparation. 8. No significant variance was found between the two groups in their family status, major teaching fields, and the age at which they started teaching.
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