Comparative test methods for evaluating shear strength of structural lumber Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/s4655j97n

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract or Summary
  • Five different test methods to determine the parallel-to-grain shear strength of Douglas-fir structural lumber were compared. Four methods assessed the shear strength of lumber sections having a full nominal two by four inch cross-section. These were: three-point bending, four-point bending, five-point bending, and torsion. The fifth method was the ASTM D 143 small specimen test for the shear strength of clear wood. A completely randomized statistical design used seventy six pieces of nominal 2x4 inch, 12 feet long lumber to make 380 matched specimens for the five test methods (76 specimens for each test method). All full cross-section bending specimens had a constant shear span of 5d, where d is the depth of the specimen (3.5 inches). The small, clear specimens were similar to those specified in ASTM D 143 except that the thickness was one and a half inches. Analysis of variance indicated that at least one of the average shear strengths from the five different test methods was significantly different from the other (p-value = 0.00) at 5% significance level. The Duncan multiple comparison test showed that the average shear strength from the three-point bending test and the torsion test are not statistically different. The torsion test appeared to be the best test method for determining shear strength of wood as a material because this test is able to produce pure shear stress in the specimen, and always produces shear failure. The three-point bending test was a good test method for determining shear strength of wood as a structural component because this test uses a bending s et-up which closely approximates real life applications of wood, and produces the highest percentage of shear failure among the other bending test methods. The shear strengths determined from the torsion test, three-point bending test, and five-point bending test are linearly correlated with the shear strength obtained from the small, clear specimen test. The shear strengths from the small, clear specimen test and the torsion test have significant relationships with specific gravity. No test shear strength had a significant relationship with bending modulus of elasticity of original lumber.
Resource Type
Date Available
Date Copyright
Date Issued
Degree Level
Degree Name
Degree Field
Degree Grantor
Commencement Year
Advisor
Committee Member
Academic Affiliation
Non-Academic Affiliation
Subject
Rights Statement
Language
Digitization Specifications
  • File scanned at 300 ppi (Monochrome, 24-bit Color) using ScandAll PRO 1.8.1 on a Fi-6670 in PDF format. CVista PdfCompressor 4.0 was used for pdf compression and textual OCR.
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Nitin Mohan (mohanni@onid.orst.edu) on 2010-09-15T00:51:42Z No. of bitstreams: 1 RiyantoDjokoSukrisno1996.pdf: 7886975 bytes, checksum: e987ef6b2353a292319a205d219800d3 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2010-09-17T17:14:21Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 RiyantoDjokoSukrisno1996.pdf: 7886975 bytes, checksum: e987ef6b2353a292319a205d219800d3 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Digital Production(digitalproduc@gmail.com) on 2010-09-16T22:10:49Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 RiyantoDjokoSukrisno1996.pdf: 7886975 bytes, checksum: e987ef6b2353a292319a205d219800d3 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2010-09-17T17:14:21Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 RiyantoDjokoSukrisno1996.pdf: 7886975 bytes, checksum: e987ef6b2353a292319a205d219800d3 (MD5)

Relationships

Parents:

This work has no parents.

Last modified

Downloadable Content

Download PDF

Items