The effect of selected socio-environmental variables on the dietary intake of preschool children Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/sb397b36p

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  • This investigation was undertaken to obtain information on the dietary intake of Oregon preschool children and to determine the effect of certain socio-environmental variables on the nutrient intake of these children. Three hundred boys and girls who were attending Well Child or Multiphasic Screening Clinics in 11 counties participated in this project. A home economist interviewed the parent to obtain the child's dietary intake and socio-environmental data of the family. Dietary intake was determined by 24-hour recall or 3-day records. Nutrient intake was compared to the 1974 Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDA); intakes below 67 percent of the RDA were considered low. Correlations of socio-environmental factors with nutrient intake were determined by simple linear regression and multiple regression analysis. The mean and median of the children's intake of vitamin A, exceeded the RDA. While the median of their niacin intake was just below the RDA, the mean and median of their iron intake was below the recommended level. Protein and riboflavin were consumed abundantly, with 0 and 3.3 percent of the subjects, respectively, failing to receive two-thirds of the RDA. Sixty-three percent of the children ingested diets that supplied two to three times the RDA for protein. The nutrients most commonly lacking were iron, ascorbic acid, calcium and thiamin, with 39.7, 18.7, 15.3, and 13.0 percent, respectively, of the children having low intakes. Forty-one percent of the children received a nutrient supplement, which was not included in these calculations. The percentage of children consuming diets containing less than 67 percent of the RDA increased with age for the intakes of vitamin A, thiamin, and kilocalories. Low intakes of iron, on the other hand, declined with age. Riboflavin intake was lowest among the four- to six-year-old children. Adequacy of ascorbic acid, niacin and calcium did not show any relation to age. The socio-environmental variables examined were geographic location (urban, rural, or metropolitan), number of siblings as well as education and occupation of each parent. Other socio-environmental variables considered were whether or not the family received public assistance or had contact with the Cooperative Extension Service personnel and bulletins. When multiple regression analysis was ascorbic acid, thiamin, riboflavin, calcium, protein, and kilocalories performed, the only significant correlation (p < 0.05) was observed between the intake of ascorbic acid, mother's education, and mother's profession. Four socio-environmental variables were significantly correlated (p < 0.05) with the intake of one or more nutrients by simple linear regression. A significant correlation was found between mother's education and the intakes of ascorbic acid, calories, and thiamin. A significant correlation was observed between mother's profession and the intakes of niacin and ascorbic acid. Father's education was found to be significantly related to the intake of thiamin. The only significant, negative correlation was found between the intake of thiamin and the number of siblings.
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