A comparative study of Oregon and New Zealand as tourist destinations : tourism resources, perceptions, and travel patterns Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/sb397b60r

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  • Tourism has become an important factor in Oregon's and New Zealand's economies. Both destinations are trying to attract even more tourists. However, many other destinations are also competing for a bigger share of the tourism market. Tourism itself is a multi-faceted phenomenon and the travel destination decision is of some importance, not only for the person but also for the tourist destinations. A Travel Destination Decision Model was developed which integrates the most important aspects of the decision process. The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between some of these facets: tourism resources, perceptions, and travel patterns. It was hypothesized that: (A) a quantitatively and qualitatively better resource base results in a more favorable perception; (B) similar resource bases may still result in different perceptions; and (C) similar perceptions result in similar travel patterns and a more favorable perception results in a higher volume of travel flow. A literature survey provided information on the tourism resource base and travel flow of both destinations. Data on the perceptions of both destinations were obtained through a survey at Frankfurt airport, Federal Republic of Germany. The sample population of this self-administered questionnaire was 356 persons of international origin. Hypotheses (A) and (B) were verified by the results of this sample population for the destinations Oregon and New Zealand. Hypothesis (C) was not supported for Oregon and New Zealand. This was attributed to their respective geographical locations and therewith induced factors such as cost, time, and accessibility. A test of hypothesis (C) for the relatively similar located states Oregon and California supported this assumption, as hypothesis (C) was verified for these destinations.
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