Parental warmth, non-authoritarianism and approval of sex-typed behaviors and children's sex role acquisition Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/sb397c596

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  • This study examined the relative contribution of parental warmth, non-authoritarianism, and approval of sex-typed behavior to children's sex role knowledge and preference. Subjects were 45 married couples, and their 25 male and 20 female preschool children. Parental attitudes toward child-rearing and sex role behavior were assessed with the Parent Attitude Research Instrument (PARI) and the Parent-Child Interaction Survey (PCIS). Children's sex role acquisition was assessed with the Sex Role Learning Index (SERLI) and the It Scale for Children (ITSC). Multiple regression analyses were used to identify variables which contributed to children's sex role knowledge and preference. SERLI results indicated that the less fathers approved of feminine behavior, the more stereotypic their sons' knowledge of the feminine role. Moreover, the less maternal warmth and paternal approval of feminine behavior, and the more maternal approval of feminine behavior, the more stereotypic sons' knowledge of the masculine role. Regression analyses failed to reveal parental variables predictive of daughters' sex role knowledge. SERLI preference results revealed that the more paternal warmth and non-authoritarianism, and the more maternal approval of feminine behavior, the greater sons' preference for masculine adult activities. Moreover, the less paternal approval of feminine behavior, the greater daughters' preference for feminine child activities. No parental variables were found to be predictive of sons' preference for child activities, daughters' preference for adult activities, or sex role preference assessed with the ITSC measure. Overall, results indicated that boys' sex role acquisition was more likely to be predicted by parental variables than girls', and fathers played a more influential role in sex role acquisition than mothers. Findings were interpreted from social learning and reciprocal role theory perspectives.
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  • File scanned at 300 ppi (Monochrome) using ScandAll PRO 1.8.1 on a Fi-6670 in PDF format. CVista PdfCompressor 4.0 was used for pdf compression and textual OCR.
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  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-09-16T21:36:53Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 RudloffPaulaM1979.pdf: 316824 bytes, checksum: 7e1e504c9cc6fa124067d2b57f1b72ec (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-09-13T16:04:10Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 RudloffPaulaM1979.pdf: 316824 bytes, checksum: 7e1e504c9cc6fa124067d2b57f1b72ec (MD5)
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  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2013-09-16T21:36:53Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 RudloffPaulaM1979.pdf: 316824 bytes, checksum: 7e1e504c9cc6fa124067d2b57f1b72ec (MD5) Previous issue date: 1978-08-04

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