Graduate Thesis Or Dissertation

 

Response of market hogs to periodic changes among nutritionally similar rations Public Deposited

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  • An experiment was conducted during the period November 1967 to November 1968 at Oregon State University (OSU) and the Umatilla Branch Experiment Station (BES) at Hermiston, two trials at each location, to answer several questions: (1) could comparable rations for swine be formulated by a computer on a least-cost basis; (2) would the rations produce equal results when fed; and (3) what effect would the switching of these rations during the feeding period have on the rate of gain, feed efficiency, and carcass characteristics of the pigs. At OSU there were 45 pigs in each trial divided into 15 groups. Each of these groups received all rations in different sequences. At BES there were 168 pigs in each trial divided into 14 groups. Eight of the groups, in replicates of two groups per ration, were fed a given ration for the entire trial; the other six groups received all rations in different sequences. A total of seven different rations were fed in the two trials. Six rations were formulated by the computer on a least-cost basis; the other was a standard experiment station ration. Three different rations were used in each trial and the standard ration was used in both trials. Analysis of the data from the experiment showed that: (1) rations for swine can be formulated by computer on a least-cost basis if care is taken to insure that the input data given the computer to formulate the rations is correct; (2) these rations will produce nearly equal results when fed if both the economic and physical aspects are considered and not either alone; (3) switching the rations during the feeding period will produce little effect on the pigs for rate of gain, feed efficiency, or carcass characteristics. The significant differences between sequences, direct ration effects, residual ration effects, and constant ration vs. switched ration were not consistent and could not be interpreted to indicate that any of the above conclusions were invalid.
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