Drop size distributions produced by turbulent pipe flow of immiscible liquids Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/st74cs809

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  • Drop size distributions produced by the turbulent pipe flow of dispersions of immiscible liquids were measured photographically. A mathematical model was developed which predicted both the shape of the experimentally observed distributions and the experimentally observed kinetics of the breakup process. The mutually saturated water and organic phases were pumped separately and mixed by injecting the organic phase along the axis of the vertical, 0.745-inch ID, 40-foot pipe which formed the test section. Provision was made to allow the dispersion formed by the action of the turbulence to be photographed at 27, 209, 421, and 576 pipe diameters below the mixing jet. The position of the focal plane of the camera along the radius of the pipe could also be adjusted. Photographs were thus obtained at dimensionless distance of 0.05, 0.1, and 0.4 from the wall. Average flow rates were varied from 14 ft/sec to 20 ft/sec. Three organic phases were studied at concentrations ranging from 0.6% to 10% by volume. Dispersed phase viscosity and interfacial tension varied from 1 cp to 18 cp and 13 to 40 dyne/cm respectively. The experimentally observed distributions were all skewed toward small drop sizes. No distribution law with any theoretical basis could be found in the literature by which experimental distributions could be correlated. Thus the distributions are presented in graphical form. The stochastic model developed to describe the breakup process indicates that each breakup event leads to two daughter drops with uniformly distributed volume ratios and a very small satellite droplet. The model contains three parameters, the maximum stable drop size, the slope of the probability curve above the maximum stable drop size, and the size range of the satellite drops. An empirical correlation exists to predict the first parameter of the model, but none exists for the second and third parameters.
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