Graduate Thesis Or Dissertation

 

Public interest organization activity in environmental decisions : a case study of integrating source separation services into the Corvallis, Oregon, solid waste franchise Public Deposited

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  • This study was conducted to observe the manner in which three local public interest organizations participated in a local, environmentallyoriented decision process. The study period began in December, 1978, with the passage of a revised solid waste ordinance (Ord. 78-102) for the City of Corvallis, OR. The main forum for public participation during the first year of the study centered around the Resource Recovery Advisory Task Force (RRATF), established in December, 1978, to discuss solid waste issues and make recommendations to the Corvallis City Council. In December, 1979, the Corvallis City Council accepted the RRATF recommendations, which called for the creation of a new, pe manent advisory board (the Source-Separation Board); the development of a new ordinance, separate from the solid waste ordinance, to address source separation services; and the use of the RRATF Final Report as a guideline for City decisions. In November, 1980, Ord. 80-98 was passed by the City Council. This ordinance amended Ord. 78-102 to include the provision of source separation services by the existing solid waste franchise holder, Corvallis Disposal Co. (CDC) and marked the end of the study period. The study considers the issues addressed by RRATF, City staff, City Council, CDC, the public interest organizations and the Source Separation Board, and describes the techniques employed by the involved organizations to influence decisions regarding these issues. Although numerous influencing efforts were made, the study concludes that the most powerful tool for impacting solid waste decisions appears to be control of the flow of waste materials, rather than the use of a particular political technique. The study also documents the considerable influence held by paid City staff, when compared to Citizen Advisory Committees, elected officials, and the general public.
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