Graduate Thesis Or Dissertation

 

Adjacent structure response sensitivity to seismic events using the direct differentiation method Public Deposited

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  • The response of adjacent structural systems to earthquake motions is investigated using the finite element framework OpenSees. Results of sensitivity analyses demonstrate that structural response quantities can increase in either or both of the adjacent structures for specific configurations. The structural models used include steel moment-resisting frames and rigid shear walls. The soil that underlies both buildings is modeled with a "structure-soil- structure spring" that connects the structural models. Due to the variety of building heights in urban environments, all combinations of four-, eight-, and twenty-story buildings are analyzed. Six shallow crustal earthquake motions are selected to model the dynamic responses of structural models. Sensitivity analyses are carried out using the direct differentiation method (DDM) with respect to parameters associated with the structure-foundation-soil systems, including floor mass, story stiffness, and soil stiffness. The DDM allows for computation of the time history of response sensitivity with respect to each parameter, in addition to the deterministic, or mean, time history response computed as part of an ordinary, non-linear, dynamic analysis. The response time histories can then be used to make a first-order approximation of the change in building response with respect to prescribed changes in a given parameter. The results of these analyses demonstrate that the effects of structure-soil-structure interaction are generally negligible for the steel, moment-resisting frame structure pairs investigated. The rigid shear walls demonstrated effects of structure-soil-structure interaction, particularly in the smaller wall mimicking the motion of the larger wall. Further research is needed in this area, particularly in refining the soil model to more fully reflect the response of realistic soil.
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