A quantitative comparison of cardiovascular imaging systems with respect to the resolution capabilities and the resulting skin entrance doses operating in both fluoroscopic and cine mode Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/tq57nt77m

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  • The increasing use of medical procedures using ionizing radiation has increased significantly in recent years. In 1987, the National Council on Radiation Protection Report 93 (NCRP) reported that the average exposure ionizing radiation was 53mRem/year (0.53mSv/year). In their most recent study on radiation exposures NCRP Report 160 in 2009, the average exposure to ionizing radiation was 297.6mRem/year (2.976mSv/year). This is increase of over 243.6mRem/year (2.436mSv/year). In an effort to show that modern invasive cardiovascular imaging systems with their advanced imaging hardware and image reconstruction software processes; a reduction in the patient exposure rate while providing acceptable image resolution is possible. Several imaging systems were tested using both image intensified (II) and flat panel detector (FPD) imaging. By reducing the entrance exposure rate, diagnostic acceptable image spatial and contrast resolution standards were exceeded. The dose rate reduction from using a FPD over an II system in the same fluoroscopic normal dose mode of operation was over 10.2%. An even greater dose reduction of 38.8% was seen by operating the FPD in low fluoroscopic dose mode while maintaining diagnostic acceptable image spatial and contrast resolution standards as well. A similar reduction in dose rates were seen while operating in the cine mode of imaging.
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