Graduate Thesis Or Dissertation

 

Interpersonal Predictors of Suicide Ideation and Attempt: Two Studies Based on Data Collected from a Statewide Survey of 8th and 11th Grade Students Public Deposited

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https://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/tx31qr05p

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  • Counseling professionals working with adolescent populations are reporting more and more adolescents experiencing suicidal ideation and attempt each year. The current literature on adolescent suicidality lacks theoretical presence, appears to rely on implications from findings on suicidal adults, and seems limited to in-patient teenaged populations (e.g., Horton et al., 2015; King et al., 2017). Based on the Interpersonal Theory of Suicide (IPTS; Joiner et al., 2009), the purpose of this dissertation was to examine the extent to which the interpersonal constructs of thwarted belongingness and perceived burdensomeness predicted adolescent suicidal ideation and attempt in 8th and 11th graders. The researcher investigated the interpersonal constructs through two studies based on an archival dataset obtained from the 2017 Oregon Healthy Teen Survey. Both studies utilized binomial logistic regression analysis as the analytic method. The first study (N = 11,505) examined the extent to which the interpersonal constructs of thwarted belongingness and perceived burdensomeness predicted adolescent suicidal ideation and attempt in 8th graders. Results indicated that 8th grade students were at higher risk of suicide ideation when experiencing poor mental/emotional health, poor sense of agency, increased school days missed due to feeling unsafe, feeling sad/hopeless, being not straight, being non-binary, and being bullied; the insignificant proxy items for suicide ideation were low perceived self-efficacy, poor grades, having a caring teacher, and total school days missed. In the second model, results indicated that 8th grade students were at a higher risk of suicide attempt when experiencing poor mental/emotional health, poor sense of agency, poor grades, increased school days missed due to feeling unsafe, feeling sad/hopeless, being non-binary, and being bullied; the insignificant proxy items for suicide attempt were low perceived self-efficacy, being not straight, having a caring teacher, and total school days missed. The binomial logistic regression analysis showed that the model was able to correctly predict 87.1% of the suicide ideation outcome and 92.3% of the suicide attempt outcome. The second study (N=10,131) examined the extent to which the interpersonal constructs of thwarted belongingness and perceived burdensomeness predicted adolescent suicidal ideation and attempt in 11th graders. Results indicated that 11th graders were at higher risk for both suicide ideation and attempt when characterized by poor emotional/mental health, poor sense of agency, feeling sad/hopeless, being not straight, and having a disability. The insignificant proxy items for both suicide ideation and attempt were low perceived self-efficacy, being non-binary, volunteering, and total school days missed. Binomial logistic regression analysis showed that the model predicted 85.6% of suicide ideation and 85.6% of suicide attempt in 11th grade students. Overall, findings in both studies contribute to the growing body of knowledge that supports the constructs of perceived burdensomeness and thwarted belongingness in the IPTS to conceptualize suicide behavior. Specifically, findings in these studies offer strong support of the theory’s application in understanding suicidal ideation and suicide attempts in 8th and 11th grade students. The findings offer relevant implications for practicing school counselors, clinical mental health counselors, counselor educators, and other stakeholders working with adolescent populations.
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