An investigation of transition from penetration to deflection in the fracture of bi-material interfaces Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/v692t833t

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  • The problem of determining whether a crack impinging on an interface will penetrate into the substrate or deflect along the interface is vital to the effective design of layered and composite material systems. Of particular interest is the transition between crack propagation by penetration through an interface and deflection along an interface. There has been a great deal of work done on this problem to determine what parameters and formulations are necessary to accurately determine under what conditions penetration-deflection transition will occur. Previous work has studied this problem using stress-based, energy-based, and combined stress-energy-based approaches. Most recently, a combined stress-energy-based approach was implemented via a cohesive-zone formulation; this work showed the conceptual basis and correctness of the cohesive-zone approach, however only presented limited investigation into the behavior penetration-deflection transition. Work presented here expands this investigation on transition, exposing trends and behavior that emerge as certain dimensionless groups are varied. Principles of linear elastic fracture mechanics and, as in previous work, cohesive-theory are applied to a bi-material system in tension through the use of the commercial finite element analysis package ABAQUS. Dimensionless groups, including strength ratios, toughness ratios, fracture-length scales, and substrate toughness scales are varied systematically to show resulting system behavior in a generalized fashion. In using the cohesive-zone method, aspects of previous stress-based and energy-based formulations are reproduced. It is also shown where these formulations cease to be valid, revealing unique and previously undetected transitional interface fracture behavior. The results presented here will prove valuable in interface design as the described generalized trends can be used as references in the design of new layered and composite systems.
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