Graduate Thesis Or Dissertation

 

Post-colonialist Pathways : Building Potential for Multicultural Service Learning at Community Colleges Public Deposited

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https://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/v692t914t

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  • Latina/o student enrollments in community colleges in the United States are rapidly growing, yet Latina/o student success rates have not matched this growth. There is a need for community college programs that serve Latina/o student populations more effectively and that incorporate multicultural educational practices into college programs. The purpose of this dissertation was to respond to Latina/o community college student needs by suggesting post-colonialist programmatic considerations for the implementation of service learning programs. Using Anzaldúa's (1999) Mestiza consciousness theory, this study analyzed community learning testimonios written by indigenous Latin American cultures and identified common themes applicable to a process of critical consciousness development in social movements as well as (potentially) critical educational programs. The themes common across the four testimonies were (a) collective motivation for learning, (b) organizational dynamics, practices, and values, (c) critical social consciousness, and (d) transcendent communal awareness of identity. This study also contributed to research in this field by exploring qualitative data to build on scholarly understanding of Latina/o students' values and educational goals with an emphasis on critical awareness and service. In the second half of the study, the researcher interviewed Latina/o student participants in a Northwest community college service learning program. Interview questions were guided by post-colonialist theory and themes from the previously analyzed testimonios, and these interviews were analyzed to discover whether any shared elements existed between the indigenous testimonies and the interviews. The researcher did find shared elements that appeared between the testimonies and the service-learning interviews. These shared elements included development of collective identity, critical education, and global social consciousness. At the same time, the researcher also noted that the themes presented differently in the community college context than in Latin American social justice movements. For example, while collective motivation arising from hardship was key in the testimonies, the critical education was most central in the community college setting. Based on these findings, a model was adapted for the development of critical consciousness through social justice service projects that will aid program leaders seeking post-colonialist frameworks for service programs that promote Latina/o student empowerment in the future. Furthermore, the findings and the model may be used by future researchers examining social justice service learning programs. This dissertation includes three standalone manuscripts. The first focused on exploration of literature in Hispanic education, post-colonialist theory, and service learning; the second described the analysis of testimonies and recoded themes from post-colonialist theory that were present in them; and the third detailed a process of interview and analysis that further advanced understanding of the roles of post-colonialist themes and elements from social justice movements in a community college setting.
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  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Julie Kurtz(julie.kurtz@oregonstate.edu) on 2015-12-31T19:24:00Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 CateRachaelE2016.pdf: 3175232 bytes, checksum: c2a6b31f77c66da6d62240dcff86fe92 (MD5)
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  • 2017-08-14 to 2018-02-13

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