A factor analysis of professional education competencies and community college instructors of trade and industrial education Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/v692t957m

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  • Purposes of the Study The study had several purposes, the major one being to determine the common professional education competencies needed by community college instructors of trade and industrial education. Two other purposes of the study were to determine if differences existed among community colleges according to scores trade and industrial instructors assigned to each of 99 professional education competencies and determine if community college trade and industrial instructors resembled one another according to values given the 99 professional education competencies. Procedures A mail survey questionnaire was developed to collect data. The 99 item questionnaire was designed so that instructors could respond to the level of proficiency necessary for each competency in relation to their job. Their responses consisted of indicating whether no, slight, moderate, considerable or complete competency was needed. A total of 40 community colleges, ten in each of four states (California, Colorado, Oregon, and Washington), were selected for the study. The sample of 160 instructors was obtained by randomly selecting four trade and industrial instructors from each of the community colleges identified in the population. Data were analyzed by utilizing analysis of variance and factor analytic techniques. Selected Findings A one-way classification analysis of variance revealed that, except for one competency, no differences existed among community colleges according to scores trade and industrial instructors assigned to each of 99 professional education competencies. Teacher educators may consider this community college similarity when developing or revising curricula. The R-technique of factor analysis was used to identify common professional education competencies. A five-factor solution extracted 48 competencies that had factor loadings of ± . 50 or higher. Four of the five factors extracted were identified as follows: 1. Factor I was a general factor with three interpretable sub-factors. Sub-factor 1a was named History, Philosophy, and Objectives; sub-factor 1b was named Community Relations; and sub-factor 1c was named Professionalism and Student Relations. 2. Factor II was identified as Program Operation. 3. Factor III was summarized with the title of Measurement and Course Construction. 4. Factor IV was labeled Instructional Strategies. Nine of the ten highest mean ranked professional education competencies in the study clustered under Factor IV, Instructional Strategies. The highest mean ranked competency in the study was motivate students in the classroom, shop, and laboratory and the lowest mean ranked competency in the study was interpret the history of education. The Q-technique of factor analysis revealed that trade and industrial instructors resemble one another with regard to values assigned to professional education competencies. The high specificity of structure-- one generated factor--strongly suggested that professional education needs of trade and industrial instructors are not as complex or diverse as had been widely assumed. The study demonstrated that the development, administration, and factor analysis of a professional education competencies questionnaire does contribute to the identification and evaluation of common factors among different competencies and instructors. It is an effective and efficient method of obtaining much of the information essential for designing and developing curricula.
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