Stress, personality, and social functioning during a major stressful event for high school female students in Taiwan Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/vx021h85k

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  • Stress associated with gaining admission to first-choice colleges has increased dramatically during the past decade in Taiwan (Republic of China) and has become a process charged with anxiety. The purpose of this study was to explore the impact of college entrance exams upon student well-being, based upon the assumption that the Matriculation Examination (TME) for university-level admission is a significant stressor among high school students in the Republic of China (R.O.C.) It was hypothesized that student self-confidence and levels of social functioning would effect student mood and that there would be a reciprocal relationship between social functioning and self-confidence, each of which would influence college entrance examination scores. Data were collected during the spring of 1995 from 350 senior female students at the leading female high school in Taipei, R.O.C. Selected subjects were asked to complete the Moos (1990) Health and Daily Living Form - Youth at 12 weeks (Time One) and at one week (Time Two) prior to graduation, which was followed within five weeks by the college entrance tests. A total of 316 (Time One) and 321 (Time Two) surveys were completed. Among the more important results, at Time One confident students reflected more positive moods in coping with examination stress, whereas at Time Two confident students also reflected positive moods in the absence of distress, in contrast to students with less confidence who experienced greater degrees of distress. With respect to social functioning, results indicated that at Time One only friends and integration of school activities were significantly related to positive moods, whereas only schools reflected a negative relationship to distressed moods. Family relationships did not exercise an important role at either stage. In addition, self-confidence had no significant relationship to either family or friends, but was significantly related to schools. This finding indicated that highly self-confident students were more likely to participate in school projects or activities, and that greater social integration in school resulted in higher self-confidence. However, self-confidence, social functioning, and mood did not affect student examination grades. The failure to predict actual exam performances indicated that other variables such as academic ability were more important than preparatory coping responses or effective social functioning.
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