Analysis of factors associated with success of graduates of Clothing, Textiles, and Related Arts in obtaining first positions Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/w0892d80q

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  • The objectives of this study were: 1. To determine the job-acquisition skills used by the 1976 and 1977 Clothing, Textiles, and Related Arts graduates of Oregon State University in obtaining first positions. 2. To assess the relationship between success of the Clothing, Textiles, and Related Arts graduates of Oregon State University and selected variables. 3. To make recommendations for Clothing, Textiles, and Related Arts undergraduate curriculum in relation to job-acquisition competencies. Respondents to the branching-type questionnaire were 83 graduates (80.4%) of the 1976 and 1977 classes from the Clothing, Textiles, and Related Arts Department at Oregon State University. Respondents' answers were assigned weighted scores for success, sense of direction, and geographic mobility. Additional information recorded included: job-acquisition skills used, most helpful jobacquisition skill used, and sources of information used by the job applicant in acquiring first job; applicant's attendance at Oregon State University sponsored training sessions, grade point average, employment status, number of interviews, number of job offers, length of time spent looking for job, employer's primary business, and description of position.- Data were tabulated and interpreted by means of product moment correlation, chi square, and frequency distribution. Ninety -eight percent (N=81) of those (N=83) respondents completed the questionnaire and were assigned a success score. Almost two-thirds of the 63 employed and job-seeking respondents stated they wanted to stay in their field of training. The mean grade point average reported by the alumnae was slightly above 3.00. Fifty-four percent of the employed and job-seeking respondents attended only one session on job-seeking skills while they were students at Oregon State University. Ninety-seven percent of the jobseeking respondents used one or more job-acquisition skills. The most frequently used were completion of job-application forms, participation in interview, compiling of personal inventory, preparation of chronological rdsum4, preparation of functional rgsumg, and inquiring of employer of available openings. The average number of job-acquisition skills used by the respondents was seven. For the employed respondents the median time spent seeking work was less than one week. Forty-five percent of the respondents accepted the first offer of a job. Sixty-eight percent of the employed respondents were working in a job related to their field of training. Nearly one-half (48%) of the employed respondents were in managerial training programs or managerial positions in their first job. No significant correlation was found between success scores and the number of job-acquisition skills used, the number of sources of information used, geographic mobility, or type of job-acquisition skill cited as being most helpful. Significant positive correlation resulted between success scores and grade point average and sense of direction. There was significant negative correlation with the number of types of training sessions in job-acquisition skills attended. Preparation of a chronological resume, commercially printing a resume, and writing a follow-up letter were significantly related to successful employment. The investigation provided data used in secondary analysis of sub-sample groups to determine relationships between selected variables. The number of job-acquisition skills used did not significantly influence the length of time spent by the job-seeker in obtaining the first job. Where the job-seeker applied for work or the location of employment did not significantly influence length of time prior to accepting a job, the number of job offers, or the successful employment of respondents. The respondent who attended more types of training sessions and/or used more job-acquisition skills participated in a greater number of interviews before accepting a job offer. Neither the number of job-acquisition skills used nor the number of types of job-acquisition skills training sessions attended by the job-seeker appeared to significantly influence the number of job offers. Recommendations formulated for the Clothing, Textiles, and Related Arts Department at Oregon State University suggested continued emphasis on the training in job-seeking skills in the educational process, since a variety of skills and information sources were used by graduates of the classes of 1976 and 1977 in obtaining positions.
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