Occupants' satisfaction and problems among four categories of passive solar systems Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/w0892f98c

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  • The purpose of this study was to determine if occupants' satisfaction and problems with their houses differed by four categories of passive solar systems. The four categories were: 1) south facing window, 2) sunspace, 3) south facing window + sunspace, and 4) south facing window + sunspace + Trombe wall. The objectives were: 1) to determine if occupants' satisfaction with 12 features of their houses differed by four categories of passive solar systems, 2) to determine if the occupants' overall satisfaction with features of their houses differed by four categories of passive solar systems, 3) to assess if there were differences in occupants' reported occurrence of 18 problems among the four categories of passive solar systems, and 4) to assess if occupants' overall problem differed among the four categories of passive solar systems. The data were collected in a mail survey, Passive Solar Homes in Oregon, in 1986. The sample size for this study consisted of 273 passive solar houses in Oregon. Statistical analyses of the data were computed using frequency distributions, Chi-square tests, and one-way analysis of variance. The majority of the respondents in this study were young, around 45 years, lived in small households, were college educated, and owned their houses. Their mean gross family income was in the category of $ 40,000 through $ 49,999. The majority of the houses in this sample were single family detached built on one to two acres of land. The median size of the houses was in the category of 1,500 through 1,999 square feet, and they were located outside the city limits. The category of passive solar system used most in the design of the houses was the south facing window + sunspace system. The majority of the respondents were very satisfied with the following features of their houses: time and effort required in daily operation, exterior design of house, floor plan, interior decorating and general maintenance requirements. The problem of cleaning of high window or glass areas was reported by most respondents. There was a significant (p <̲ .05) difference in occupants' satisfaction with the general maintenance requirements (p = .008) among the four categories of passive solar houses. There was no difference (p <̲ .05) in occupants' satisfaction with 1) energy savings, 2) heat distribution, 3) cooling distribution, 4) humidity control, 5) exterior design of house, 6) comfort level, 7) effort and time required in daily operation, 8) performance of mechanical components, 9) floor plan, 10) internal noise level, and 11) interior decorating among the four categories of passive solar systems. There was no significant (p <̲ .05) difference in occupants' overall satisfaction among the four categories of passive solar systems. There was a significant (p <̲ .075) difference in occupants' reported occurrence with three problems: 1) high noise levels (p=.072), 2) inadequate weatherstripping or caulking (p=.058), and 3) coverings for sloped windows (p=.033) among the four categories of passive solar systems. There was no difference (p <̲ .075) in occupants' reported occurrence of 1) excessive glare, 2) excessive humidity, 3) condensation on windows, 4) extreme temperature swings, 5) nonresiliency of floors, 6) not warm enough, 7) excessive heat loss through aluminum windows, 8) inadequate shading of deciduous trees, 9) manual use of movable window insulation, 10) inadequate movement of heat, 11) high windows or other glass areas cleaned, 12) fading of furniture, walls, or coverings, 13) lack of privacy, 14) excessive drafts, and 15) rooms cool down too fast among the four categories of passive solar systems. Occupants also did not differ (p <̲ .075) in their overall problem among the four categories of passive solar systems. The findings of this research will be of use and interest to future consumers of passive solar houses and housing professionals involved with passive solar energy. Educators and researchers concerned with solar energy and policy makers dealing with energy issues will also benefit from the study.
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  • File scanned at 300 ppi (Monochrome) using Capture Perfect 3.0 on a Canon DR-9050C in PDF format. CVista PdfCompressor 4.0 was used for pdf compression and textual OCR.
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  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-05-29T15:14:40Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 MalroutuYaminiLakshmi1989.pdf: 1193968 bytes, checksum: d7e85ae6cc6980ddde6c3c62a22659e8 (MD5)
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  • 1989
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Kirsten Clark (kcscannerosu@gmail.com) on 2013-05-21T21:50:14Z No. of bitstreams: 1 MalroutuYaminiLakshmi1989.pdf: 1193968 bytes, checksum: d7e85ae6cc6980ddde6c3c62a22659e8 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2013-06-25T20:28:47Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 MalroutuYaminiLakshmi1989.pdf: 1193968 bytes, checksum: d7e85ae6cc6980ddde6c3c62a22659e8 (MD5) Previous issue date: 1989-03-10

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