A system analysis method for water quality management by flow augmentation Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/w6634633t

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract or Summary
  • A rapid expansion of population and industrialization in recent years has created new and difficult problems in water resources management. Prudent management of water quality will require that more efficient methods be developed for evaluating large volumes of data on complex river systems, and tabulating the results in a form readily usable by the persons responsible for decisions. The digital computer is the most promising tool for rapid analysis of these complex water problems. The objective of this thesis is the development of a digital computer program which will investigate the dissolved oxygen relationships in flowing streams and provide for automatic adjustment of flows to maintain minimum dissolved oxygen requirements. The computer program herein developed was applied to the Willamette River Basin in Northwestern Oregon to illustrate its use, but it is general in character so that it may be applied to any drainage basin. Three orders of streams including not more than sixty lengths of river (reaches) may be considered in any given study by a computer with sixty thousand digits of core storage. Limitations on the size of the river system which may be considered are imposed by computer storage capacity above the forty thousand digits needed for program use. The results of this study indicate that: 1. A digital computer using the program developed can, in a few minutes, complete an analysis which would require many man hours of manual computation time. 2. The digital computer program developed is a useful tool for investigating the oxygen relationships existing in a river system under present loadings and flows and for predicting the conditions that will be encountered under future loadings. 3. A computer program of this type could be adapted to nearly any of the quality parameters normally considered or possibly a combination of several parameters at such time as mathematical formulations describing their behavior in streams are available.
Resource Type
Date Available
Date Copyright
Date Issued
Degree Level
Degree Name
Degree Field
Degree Grantor
Commencement Year
Advisor
Academic Affiliation
Non-Academic Affiliation
Subject
Rights Statement
Peer Reviewed
Language
Digitization Specifications
  • File scanned at 300 ppi using Capture Perfect 3.0 on a Canon DR-9050C in PDF format. CVista PdfCompressor 5.0 was used for pdf compression and textual OCR.
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2014-06-04T20:10:49Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 WorleyJohnL1963.pdf: 2550688 bytes, checksum: 0787825c6cf8b8490d7476131f32b370 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Katy Davis(kdscannerosu@gmail.com) on 2014-06-06T17:32:19Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 WorleyJohnL1963.pdf: 2550688 bytes, checksum: 0787825c6cf8b8490d7476131f32b370 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2014-06-06T17:32:19Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 WorleyJohnL1963.pdf: 2550688 bytes, checksum: 0787825c6cf8b8490d7476131f32b370 (MD5) Previous issue date: 1963-05-14
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Madison Medley (mmscannerosu@gmail.com) on 2014-06-04T19:00:53Z No. of bitstreams: 1 WorleyJohnL1963.pdf: 2550688 bytes, checksum: 0787825c6cf8b8490d7476131f32b370 (MD5)

Relationships

Parents:

This work has no parents.

Last modified

Downloadable Content

Download PDF

Items