Pacific Blue Marlin management in Hawaii: review of the Blue Marlin Fishery and an assessment of the current management needs Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/w66348052

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  • The Pacific Blue Marlin stock supports both recreational and commercial fisheries throughout their Pacific-wide distribution. The commercial component of the fishery imposes a greater fishing mortality on the stock but the recreational component may be more economically dependent on the continued health of the fishery (Orbach 1989). The recreational or sport component of the blue marlin fishery generates large incomes for tourist-based coastal communities. It was estimated that the half dozen annual billfish tournaments held in Kailua Kona, Hawaii generate several million dollars a year for the local community (Gaffney per. comm. 1991). This high dependence on the blue marlin fishery by the sport component suggests that any future billfish management in the U.S. may become primarily an economic, social and political issue and the conservation issue may be considered secondary (Orbach 1989). Questions that must be addressed to help fisheries managers establish appropriate management measures include, "what is the recreational value of a blue marlin and what is the best use of the resource?" Society must determine if blue marlin are worth more when saved for the recreational experience or harvested for the use as food. Determining a first order value of a single fish, if harvested for consumption, is dependent on the price the fish will bring at the market. Establishing an accurate system to estimate the value of a blue marlin saved for the sporting experience is highly complex. To calculate this, a dollar value must be placed on abstract factors such as the aesthetic value of being out on the ocean, or the value of having an opportunity to fight a large billfish. Samples and Schug (1985) estimated charter patrons contributed $39.4 million to the Hawaii charter fishing industry as a result of their demand for overall charter fishing experiences. If the direct and indirect expenditures were included in the evaluation, charter patrons contributed $52.4 million to the Hawaii economy. The blue marlin contribution to these estimates are unknown. However, this same study also showed blue marlin was the most desired species sought after by the charter patrons.
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