Graduate Thesis Or Dissertation

 

The effect of grazing interval on forage quality and production of meadow foxtail Public Deposited

Downloadable Content

Download PDF
https://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/w6634837b

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract
  • For the last fifty years, meadow foxtail (Alopecurus pratensis L.) has been invading native flood meadows throughout the Harney Basin in southeastern Oregon. The expansion of this grass species has been the result of its broad climatic requirements and ability to withstand drought while thriving in saturated soil conditions for a large part of the growing season. Meadow foxtail starts growth as soon as adequate soil moisture exists. Managing this early maturing hay species can prove to be a challenge because soil saturation and elevated water tables make it difficult to harvest hay when forage quality and yield are maximized. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether planned grazing would retard maturation and thus prolong forage quality. Treatments included a non-grazed control and grazing durations of 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks. Grazing was initiated in May of 1998 and 1999 on six replications of each treatment arranged in a randomized block design. Within each treatment/replicate combination, ten 0.2 m² plots were clipped to ground level at about two week intervals from May to August. The samples were weighed and dried for standing crop estimation and 4 of the 10 samples were selected at random and analyzed for acid detergent fiber (ADF), neutral detergent fiber (NDF), and crude protein (CP). Analyses of variance, least significant differences, and regression analyses were calculated to determine whether or not there were statistical differences of P≤0.05. We found that early spring grazing decreased forage yield significantly. An increase in CP with duration of defoliation was expected and obtained. The results of grazing on the fiber components of forage, however, were inconclusive. Grazing had minimal effect on fiber fractions, but did delay the decline in CP. However, there was a fairly severe decline in hay production, even with the shortest duration of grazing.
Resource Type
Date Available
Date Copyright
Date Issued
Degree Level
Degree Name
Degree Field
Degree Grantor
Commencement Year
Advisor
Committee Member
Academic Affiliation
Non-Academic Affiliation
Subject
Rights Statement
Publisher
Peer Reviewed
Language
Digitization Specifications
  • File scanned at 300 ppi (Monochrome, 256 Grayscale) using Capture Perfect 3.0 on a Canon DR-9050C in PDF format. CVista PdfCompressor 4.0 was used for pdf compression and textual OCR.
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Kirsten Clark (kcscannerosu@gmail.com) on 2012-08-23T18:16:15Z No. of bitstreams: 1 WenickJessJ2001.pdf: 1230836 bytes, checksum: d2b2783c178dd37f5bfb030e066ca8ee (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2012-08-23T20:22:50Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 WenickJessJ2001.pdf: 1230836 bytes, checksum: d2b2783c178dd37f5bfb030e066ca8ee (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2012-08-23T20:25:35Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 WenickJessJ2001.pdf: 1230836 bytes, checksum: d2b2783c178dd37f5bfb030e066ca8ee (MD5) Previous issue date: 2000-10-30
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2012-08-23T20:25:35Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 WenickJessJ2001.pdf: 1230836 bytes, checksum: d2b2783c178dd37f5bfb030e066ca8ee (MD5)

Relationships

Parents:

This work has no parents.

In Collection:

Items