A study of preservice teachers' attitudes toward mainstreaming Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/wd3760354

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  • The purposes of this study were to determine the effects of level (elementary and secondary), program status (beginning, midway, and student teaching), and demongraphic variables (experience, success, college supervisor support, supervising teacher support, additional support services, and school type) on preservice teachers' attitudes toward mainstreaming. The population consisted of 91 secondary and 143 elementary preservice teachers at Western Oregon State College in Monmouth, Oregon. The instrument selected was the Attitude Toward Mainstreaming Scale. Data were collected during winter and spring of the 1983-84 school year. Approximately 220 usable questionnaires were returned. No significant difference for level was found. However, a statistical difference was found for program status. Beginning preservice teachers' attitudes differed from midway preservice teachers' attitudes. A significant predictor of positive attitudes toward mainstreaming for the total population was college supervisor support. When student teachers were considered separately, perceived degree of success was the significant predictor of positive attitudes toward mainstreaming. Three significant correlations were found. 1. Experience correlated with degree of success, supervising teacher support and additional support services. 2. College supervisor support correlated with supervising teacher support. 3. Degrees of success correlated with supervising teacher support, college supervisor support, and additional support services. Perceived degree of success was dependent on level. Elementary preservice teachers indicated higher levels of perceived degree of success than secondary preservice teachers. Experience, supervising teacher support, additional support services, and type of school were dependent on program status. Student teachers reported significantly more experience with special need students and significantly more supoprt services. Beginning preservice teachers originated from rural settings but were placed in urban areas for student teaching.
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  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-08-13T20:25:35Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 StaeblerBonitaLouise1984.pdf: 1579619 bytes, checksum: b2cae7f63a819dc3bcefc584081ad28e (MD5)
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