Multiple location evaluation of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) lines for genotypic and environmental influences on nitrogen assimilation and remobilization Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/wm117r83w

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  • Wheat production in the Pacific Northwest consists mainly of the soft white wheat market class. Over 80% of this wheat is exported. In recent years there has been an increase in soft white wheat production (due in a large part to improvements in the yielding capabilities of the genotypes grown in the Pacific Northwest). To expand into different commodity markets, it would be desirable to diversify and produce wheat cultivars representing more market classes and product uses. One opportunity would be to develop cultivars representing the Hard Red Winter market class. An effort to breed high yielding, high protein Hard Red Winter wheats is now underway at Oregon State University. This research was conducted to gain a better understanding of the components (genetic and/or environmental) that determine yield and grain protein content of hard red wheat genotypes. There were two general objectives of the research. One was to study the differences in nitrogen assimilation and remobilization in a diverse group of winter wheat genotypes grown in the different agricultural environments of Oregon. The second objective was to determine the efficacy of using "hill plots" (micro-plots) as a planting method to screen for agronomic and nitrogen assimilation traits in geneticly distinct genotypes which may be used as parents in breeding efforts. Results of this study indicate that genetic differences for nitrogen assimilation and remobilization do exist, and improvements in Pacific Northwest hard red wheat genotypes can be made with appropriate selection techniques. Data also indicate that the traditional high protein wheat genotypes (from the U.S. Great Plains) do not show an advantage from a grain protein concentration standpoint when produced in the Pacific Northwest. Additionally, the environment played a critical role in determining expression of harvest index, grain protein concentration, and nitrogen harvest index. Genotype by environment interactions were high, suggesting that zone-specific varieties may need to be developed in order to attain both high grain yields and high grain protein yields.
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