The influence of gender and structure of intellect ability factors on teacher perception of gifted children Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/wm117s31b

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  • The purpose of this study was to determine if significant differences in each of the ten Structure of Intellect (SOI) abilities measured on the SOI Screening Form for Gifted exist between students perceived by teachers as gifted and identified gifted students overlooked by teachers. The influence of teacher and student gender on teacher perception of students in both groups was investigated simultaneously. Gender-related differences in SOI gifted level abilities, specific SOI abilities which may serve as predictors of male and female teacher perception of giftedness, and SOI abilities which may serve as predictors of overlooked gifted children were also examined. The SOI Screening Form for Gifted as an identification instrument was evaluated in terms of the research findings. The subjects in this study were drawn from seven elementary schools participating in a pilot program for talented and gifted students in Greater Albany Public School District 8J in Albany, Oregon. Fifteen male and twelve female fourth, fifth, and sixth grade teachers nominated children whom they perceived as gifted members of their respective classes. Student subjects were 43 male and 30 female students who met research gifted criterion of IQ 130 and/or who were nominated as gifted by their teachers, but subsequently failed to reach criterion on a Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised (WISC-R) and/or on an Otis-Lennon Mental Abilities Test (OLMAT). The SOI Screening Form for Gifted was administered to all student subjects. The hypotheses were tested utilizing the Mann Whitney U Test. Chi-square was used in the analysis of data pertaining to the value of the SOI Screening Form for Gifted as an identification instrument. A .05 level of significance was required for all tests. Results obtained from testing of the hypotheses indicated significant differences in the following SOI abilities: (a) Memory for Symbolic Systems (MSS) scores among gifted girls overlooked by female teachers were significantly higher (p < .02) than among girls perceived gifted by female teachers; (b) Divergent Production of Semantic Units (DMU) scores among girls perceived gifted were significantly higher (p < .02) than among boys perceived gifted by female teachers; (c) DMU scores among gifted girls were significantly higher (p < .01) than among gifted boys, but no difference was observed until grade six. Rank-order comparisons of ability scores on the SOI Screening Form for Gifted suggested that: (a) Both male and female teachers perceived giftedness in boys to be related to abilities measured in the Divergent Production of Figural Units (DFU), Cognition of Semantic Relations (CMR), Memory for Symbolic Systems (MSS), and Cognition of Semantic Units (CMU) subtests; (b) Male teachers perceived giftedness in girls to be related to abilities measured in the Convergent Production of Symbolic Implications (NSI), DFU, and Memory for Symbolic Units (MSU) subtests; (c) Female teachers perceived giftedness in girls to be related to abilities measured in the DMU, Convergent Production of Symbolic Transformations (NST) and MSU subtests; (d) The three highest ability scores observed among identified gifted students were DMU, NSI, and NST for girls and CMR, Cognition of Figural Units (CFU) and Cognition of Semantic Systems (CMS) for boys. Chi-square analyses revealed no significant differences in the frequency of SOT gifted-level or below-grade-level abilities among a group of OLMAT-identified gifted and a group scoring a minimum of three gifted-level abilities on the SOI Screening Form for Gifted. The SOT Screening Form for Gifted criterion disqualified 13 OLMAT and/or WISC-R-identified gifted and qualified 13 students with OLMAT scores under 130 and as low as 103 IQ. Results of this study support findings from previous studies which show teachers as generally inefficient and ineffective in identification of gifted students.
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