Effects of additional load application orders on landing strategies Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/ws859j677

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  • The investigation of force attenuation and performance strategies to respond to changing mechanical constraints helps prevent injury as well as facilitates beneficial insight to provide appropriate instruction to athletes and students. The primary purpose of the study was to assess within subject variability of landing strategies when responding to additional load application orders. Four semi-skilled male volunteers served as subjects. The experimental arrangement consisted of a force platform and electromyography (EMG) interfaced with a computer, the Selspot Auto Tracking System, and a mechanical video system. Kinetic and kinematic data were obtained while subjects performed voluntary release drop landings for a total of 150 trials. On one day, subjects performed loaded-unloaded- loaded conditions for 25 trials each, while on the other other day, they performed unloaded-loaded-unloaded conditions for 25 trials each. Temporal and kinetic data describing the maximum impact force values and corresponding integrated EMG (IEMG) data were used in the analysis. The single subject design was used in the study. First (F1) and second (F2) maximum vertical ground reaction forces (GRF) and times of occurrence (T1, T2) were analyzed using ANOVA technique. Model statistics analysis was used for each variable to identify differing landing strategies employed by subjects. Simple regression analysis was used to assess the Newtonian response in predicting F1 and F2 by using load as the only independent variable. Multiple regression analyses were used to predict F1 and F2 from load and IEMG parameters in order to assess neuromuscular response component employed by the subjects to accommodate to changing mechanical constraints and application orders. ANOVA results identified statistically significant (p < 0.05) interaction of load and application orders for most of the subjects while dominant effect of application order was identified across subjects. Model statistics analysis as well as simple and multiple regression analyses identified unique response strategies used by individual subjects and a greater Newtonian nature of F1, as opposed to F2. Results of statistical analyses suggest unique biomechanical accommodation mechanisms were employed by each subject to respond to the changing mechanical constraints and their application orders. Within subject design analyses were not only acceptable but the preferred technique to assess individual performance differences. The results further strongly indicate the need for instructors of physical activities to be aware of the individuality of response to accommodating to landing, and that there appears to be no one best way to teach such skills.
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  • File scanned at 300 ppi (Monochrome, 256 Grayscale) using Capture Perfect 3.0 on a Canon DR-9050C in PDF format. CVista PdfCompressor 4.0 was used for pdf compression and textual OCR.
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  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-06-03T19:55:13Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 KanataniKoichiro1990.pdf: 1789189 bytes, checksum: e2a8615b055f316c4748d5796b2ba260 (MD5)
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  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-05-14T15:36:53Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 KanataniKoichiro1990.pdf: 1789189 bytes, checksum: e2a8615b055f316c4748d5796b2ba260 (MD5)
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