The Internet Usage Habits of Young Women with ADHD : Insights and Implications Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/x059cb52d

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  • Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), the most common childhood neurological disorder in the United States, also affects grown women. But girls with ADHD, who tend towards symptoms of inattentiveness, often go undiagnosed until young adulthood. This is because (a) their symptoms are less obvious than the hyperactivity common in ADHD boys, and (b) our sexist society teaches us that all little all girls are ‘dreamy,’ ‘spacy,’ and/or ‘ditzy.’ Even post-diagnosis, the obliviousness associated with untreated ADHD is often supplanted by a similar lack of awareness on the part of young ADHD women. Little scholarship concerns their demographic, and primary care providers are not required to read what has been published. As a result, their patients, young women with ADHD, insufficiently informed about the disorder. On top of that, they rarely get the chance to connect with other young ADHD women in person and face-to-face. However, the rise of the Internet over the last three decades has afforded them an unprecedented opportunity: to participate in online information seeking and storytelling about their disorder and what life with it is like for them. I sought to gauge that quality-of-life landscape typical of young ADHD women as a community and the role of their intersecting identities in shaping it; I did so by engaging in narrative analysis of two digital texts produced by young ADHD women. I went on to explain my findings according to theoretical frameworks including feminist disability theory and cyberfeminism and discern their implications.
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