Graduate Thesis Or Dissertation

 

Ultra-Wideband Relay Communication Systems Public Deposited

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https://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/x346d784x

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  • Impulse-radio ultra-wide-band (IR-UWB) signaling is a promising technique for high-speed, short-range relay communications networks. Depending on how the relay node retransmits the signal, there are two main relay schemes: conventional one-directional (one-way) relay model, and bi-directional (two-way) relay model. In bi-directional relay communications, wireless network coding (WNC), also called physical-layer network coding (PNC), could be applied to overcome the spectral efficiency limitation of the conventional one-way relay. In the first part of this work, we propose asynchronous, differential, and bidirectional decode and forward (ADBDF) and asynchronous, differential, and bidirectional denoise and forward (ADBDNF) UWB relay methods, where the relay node (RN) does not need to be synchronized with the end nodes (ENs). The proposed schemes are attractive for networks in which stringent/complicated synchronization between the RN and the ENs may not be feasible. The second part of this work focuses on UWB channel classification. We propose a 2-dimensional (2-D) LOS/NLOS classification scheme that uses skewness of the channel impulse/pulse response. The proposed channel classification decreases the complexity of existing channel classification methods and can be used in a variety of areas such as localization, relay communications, and cooperative communications. The final part of this work deals with compressive sensing (CS) algorithms that employ sub-Nyquist sampling for UWB communications. We develop coarse graining (CG) for the proposed CS sub-Nyquist sampling technique, which leads to: (1) reduced sampling rate at the receiver, and hence reduced use of analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) resources; and (2) low-complexity channel estimation.
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  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Laura Wilson(laura.wilson@oregonstate.edu) on 2015-12-31T23:31:30Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 PhD-Disertation-ArashAbbasi.pdf: 865510 bytes, checksum: 148372b27e492c83d4b30b84d77c4517 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Arash Abbasi (abbasia@oregonstate.edu) on 2015-12-29T17:44:57Z No. of bitstreams: 1 PhD-Disertation-ArashAbbasi.pdf: 865510 bytes, checksum: 148372b27e492c83d4b30b84d77c4517 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2015-12-31T23:31:30Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 PhD-Disertation-ArashAbbasi.pdf: 865510 bytes, checksum: 148372b27e492c83d4b30b84d77c4517 (MD5) Previous issue date: 2015-12-07
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Julie Kurtz(julie.kurtz@oregonstate.edu) on 2015-12-31T17:51:01Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 PhD-Disertation-ArashAbbasi.pdf: 865510 bytes, checksum: 148372b27e492c83d4b30b84d77c4517 (MD5)
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  • 2017-08-17 to 2018-02-13

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