Models relating camping to river terrace characteristics along the Rogue Scenic Waterway Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/xd07gw774

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract or Summary
  • The degree to which camping is related to selected characteristics of river terraces along the Rogue Waterway, Oregon has been analyzed. Previous attempts to formulate models relating campsite choice to characteristics of the natural environment focused on camping parties engaged in auto-camping and the aggregate population behavior rather than on describing behavior of discernible sub-groups. After a review of previous research and initial field reconnaissance, this investigation sought to identify (1) characteristics of specific groups of river travelers, (2) selected site characteristics of all campsites along the Natural River Area of the Rogue River, (3) campsite choice patterns for those specific groups of river travelers, and (4) the relation between the number of times a campsite is chosen and selected characteristics of the campsite. A descriptive campsite choice model identifying man-environment relationships was formulated for the purpose of examining campsite choice behavior. The MAN component of the descriptive model outlines the population of interest, the unit of observation within the population, and characteristics of the unit of observation. The ENVIRONMENT component of the descriptive model outlines selected variables of the terrestrial, aquatic, and micro-climatic environment that may be associated with campsite choice behavior. The methodology used in this investigation consisted of two data collection procedures undertaken concurrently. One involved interviewing one member of each camping party as the group departed the study area at which time information was solicited concerning characteristics of the camping party and selected items concerning the respondent. The other consisted of an environmental assessment of thirteen characteristics of river terraces by onsite evaluation of all river terraces classified as potential campsites. The linearity of the river corridor was a notable asset to the research. All camping parties had to pass each river terrace consecutively and respond to each camping opportunity in the same sequence. Such natural control over the camping parties was absent in other investigations of campsite choice behavior. Frequency tabulations were compiled to analyze the characteristics of camping parties and their campsite choice patterns. The research hypothesis, concerning the degree to which camping is correlated with natural characteristics of the environment, was analyzed by using multiple regression analysis. The conclusions of this investigation were: 1. Commercial parties tend to be larger (15-25 people) than non-commercial (less than 15 people). The two groups differed substantially in type of boat used and slightly in their length of stay within the study area. 2. Commercial parties chose fewer campsites (26) than did noncommercial parties (45). Both groups tended to choose certain campsites frequently. Campsite choice behavior for commercial parties shows clustering. Non-commercial parties were distributed along the entire river corridor. 3. Two models, one for commercial parties and the other for non-commercial parties, were formulated relating campsite choice behavior to thirteen selected site characteristics of river terraces. Five characteristics were significant predictor variables for the dependent variable PARTY-NIGHTS (number of parties spending one night) in both models. Eighty percent of the variance (R²) PARTY-NIGHTS was accounted for in the commercial and forty-four percent (R²) accounted for in the non-commercial model. 4. Of =the five significant terms selected for each model, three were the same variable. These were size of the campsite, size of the tributary providing potable water to the location, and boat landing. 5. The significant correlation of site characteristics with amount of camping occurring at the site for each group, permits the research hypothesis to be retained. This hypothesis is: A significant relationship exists between the amount of camping occurring at river terraces and selected characteristics of those river terraces.
Resource Type
Date Available
Date Copyright
Date Issued
Degree Level
Degree Name
Degree Field
Degree Grantor
Commencement Year
Advisor
Committee Member
Academic Affiliation
Non-Academic Affiliation
Subject
Rights Statement
Peer Reviewed
Language
Digitization Specifications
  • File scanned at 300 ppi (Monochrome, 8-bit Grayscale) using ScandAll PRO 1.8.1 on a Fi-6670 in PDF format. CVista PdfCompressor 4.0 was used for pdf compression and textual OCR.
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-10-24T17:21:38Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 PfisterRobertE1977.pdf: 1592462 bytes, checksum: e87a44c63a65e6f1a8649caf103a6499 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Madison Medley (mmscannerosu@gmail.com) on 2013-10-21T18:55:54Z No. of bitstreams: 1 PfisterRobertE1977.pdf: 1592462 bytes, checksum: e87a44c63a65e6f1a8649caf103a6499 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2013-10-28T20:35:57Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 PfisterRobertE1977.pdf: 1592462 bytes, checksum: e87a44c63a65e6f1a8649caf103a6499 (MD5) Previous issue date: 1976-07-12
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-10-28T20:35:57Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 PfisterRobertE1977.pdf: 1592462 bytes, checksum: e87a44c63a65e6f1a8649caf103a6499 (MD5)

Relationships

In Administrative Set:
Last modified: 08/10/2017

Downloadable Content

Download PDF
Citations:

EndNote | Zotero | Mendeley

Items