Synthesis and assembly of Fucus zygote cell walls with an emphasis on alignate and fucans Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/xk81jp42g

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract or Summary
  • Fucus distichus L. Powell zygotes were used to investigate cell wall synthesis and development and to construct a model of cell wall structure. Alginate synthesis was investigated. Zygotes were cultured in seawater containing ¹⁴C-bicarbonate. Alginate represented 12%, 37%, and 1.7% of the label recovered from whole zygotes, wall, and cytoplasm, respectively. Cytoplasmic alginate had 70% of the label in alternating blocks, but wall alginate had 58% of the label in polyguluronic acid blocks. The ratio of label in alginate monomers (M/G) was 0.8 (cytoplasm) and 0.5 (wall), suggesting that a C-5 alginate epimerase was active. Enzymes from marine bacteria were isolated, characterized, and used to disrupt Fucus zygote cell walls. Cell-bound lyase activity was specific for polymannuronic acid (M lyase), and released activity degraded polyguluronic acid (G lyase). A highly active M lyase from bacteria has not previously been reported. M lyase had a molecular weight of 100,000 daltons and acted in an exo-manner. The G lyase had a molecular weight of 35,000 daltons, was soluble in saturated ammonium sulfate, acted in an endo-manner, and was stimulated by calcium. Calcium reduced substrate specificity of G lyase but had no effect on the activity of M lyase. Cell walls from different stages were disrupted by G lyase and calcium chelation. The mature cell wall consisted of cellulose, alginate, and fucans (F₁ and F₂). F₂ was not present in the 6.5 hour walls, but all stages contained highly sulfated fucans covalently bound to the cellulosic portion of the wall. Calcium chelation released alginate, F₁ and F₂. Alginate and F₂ but not F₁ were degraded by G lyase treatment. F₂ was converted into a faster-moving component by mild acid hydrolysis and by G lyase treatment. The model of wall structure fits the events of development and allows a framework from which to make predictions about the behavior of wall components during subsequent experimental approaches.
Resource Type
Date Available
Date Copyright
Date Issued
Degree Level
Degree Name
Degree Field
Degree Grantor
Commencement Year
Advisor
Academic Affiliation
Non-Academic Affiliation
Subject
Rights Statement
Peer Reviewed
Language
Digitization Specifications
  • File scanned at 300 ppi (Monochrome, 8-bit Grayscale) using ScandAll PRO 1.8.1 on a Fi-6670 in PDF format. CVista PdfCompressor 4.0 was used for pdf compression and textual OCR.
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2013-08-06T19:52:02Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 DoubetScott1983.pdf: 2964238 bytes, checksum: 68aef7f55811ed3280f9764230290422 (MD5) Previous issue date: 1982-07-01
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-07-29T20:09:40Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 DoubetScott1983.pdf: 2964238 bytes, checksum: 68aef7f55811ed3280f9764230290422 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Katy Davis (kdscannerosu@gmail.com) on 2013-07-29T19:38:17Z No. of bitstreams: 1 DoubetScott1983.pdf: 2964238 bytes, checksum: 68aef7f55811ed3280f9764230290422 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Deborah Campbell(deborah.campbell@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-08-06T19:52:02Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 DoubetScott1983.pdf: 2964238 bytes, checksum: 68aef7f55811ed3280f9764230290422 (MD5)

Relationships

Parents:

This work has no parents.

Last modified

Downloadable Content

Download PDF

Items