A study of perceptual correlates to role-taking ability with fourth through sixth grade children Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/xs55mf553

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  • This study was designed for the purpose of expanding knowledge of the correlates of role-taking as measured by Feffer's Role-Taking Task. The variables of perception, sex, age, reading achievement, and ordinal position were investigated. The perceptual variables measured were visual memory, field dependence/independence, auditory memory, and organizing and synthesizing ability. The instruments used were Memory-For-Designs, Children's Embedded Figures Test, Digit Span, and Block Design, respectively. Reading Achievement was measured by the Metropolitan Achievement Test, One hundred and nine fourth through sixth grade students were administered the Role-Taking Task and the four perceptual tests. Demographic data were obtained through school records. An estimate of verbal intelligence was used as a control. Nine hypotheses were formulated, and were analyzed using Pearson product moment correlations, t-tests and stepwise regression analysis. Means and standard deviations were used to gain additional descriptive data on the variables. The hypotheses were tested using the group considered as a whole. For further analysis purposes the subjects were considered according to three age groupings, 9. 6-10. 5, 10.6-11. 5, and 11. 6- 12. 5, Data using two scoring systems on the Role-Taking Task are presented. Analysis of the data revealed that the Children's Embedded Figures Test and Digit Span had significant correlations (p < . 05) with the Role-Taking Task. Block Design and the Memory-For-Designs were not significantly related to role-taking. Of the four perceptual variables the Children's Embedded Figures Test explained the most variation, using the regression analysis. More variation was explained by the perceptual variables at the 9.6-10. 5 age range than the other age groupings including total sample. There was not a significant difference between the performance of males and females on the Role-Taking Task. However, males performed better than females at the younger age group, but this was reversed for the following two ages. The relationship between age and role-taking was significant for the total and middle age groups at the . 01 level. Reading Achievement and the Role-Taking Task were significantly related for the total group and the ages 10.6-11.5. Later and first borns did not differ significantly in their performance on the Role-Taking Task.
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