Coastal landslides in northern Oregon Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/xw42n996c

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  • Landsliding is a significant contributor to continuous erosion of the 150-mile northern Oregon coast. Direct loss of land to the sea by landslides occurs along 47 percent of the coast. The remaining 53 percent has minor shifting of sand along depositional areas such as spits and dunes. These minor movements alter coastal topography but do not erode material directly into the sea. The type of landsliding is principally controlled by the lithology of the coastline. Landslides are classified on the basis of two features: the lithology of the coastal material in the slide and the type of movement expressed by the overall shape of the slide. Slump occurs in deeply weathered sedimentary rocks and in marine terrace sands overlying seaward-dipping rocks. Rock and debris fall are mainly confined to headlands. Block glides develop along bedding planes of relatively unweathered sandstone. Debris shift occurs in thick terrace and dune sand deposits in which no slip surface is defined. Factors contributing to the cause of coastal landslides include high precipitation, easily weathered rock, and high coastal wave energy. Frequency of reported landslides is related to periods of high precipitation and high wave energy. Although rock weathering is continuous throughout the year, the final phase in disruption of slope equilibrium often occurs during winter storm conditions. Landslides on headlands and adjacent coastlines disrupt the most extensive land area. Wave refraction directly influences this relationship by focusing wave energy on promentories and on the coastline within one mile of the headlands. Distribution of coarse and fine beach material is affected by refraction in restricted coves. Severe coastal erosion has taken place in local areas. The average rates of retreat vary according to the lithology of the coastline, and have been determined as follows: unconsolidated sand and gravel - 23 feet per year; marine terrace sands overlying sandstone and clay - 20 feet per year; marine terrace sands overlying mudstone and sandy shales - 6.5 feet per year. Knowledge of the processes of marine erosion applied to local cliff protection measures can assist in increasing the effectiveness of erosion control attempts.
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  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2012-06-01T19:31:30Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 NorthWilliamBenjamin1964.pdf: 5797730 bytes, checksum: e556aadbfa99b49d747bc89f608fa79f (MD5)
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