Graduate Thesis Or Dissertation

 

Adaptive, wideband analog-to-digital conversion for convergent communication systems Public Deposited

Downloadable Content

Download PDF
https://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/xw42nc93z

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract
  • The exponential rate of advances in modern communication devices in the last several years have brought us higher levels of functionality and performance as well as reductions in physical size and power consumption. To continue this rate of advancement, next generation systems require wider bandwidth and higher resolution ADCs. Additionally, in order for ADCs to be used in a wide range of applications, reconfigurability and adaptability are critical features of future ADCs. Reconfigurable ADC architectures allow consolidation of receivers for multiple communication standards into one, providing size, power and functionality improvements over multiple discrete ADCs. This thesis presents a high performance track-and-hold block and reconfigurable high performance ADC for multi-functional communication applications. In the design of analog-to-digital converters (ADCs), the front-end track-and-hold or sample-and-hold is often one of the most challenging parts of the design. Open-loop designs with high sample rates are reaching the limits of their linearity. Presented here is a high-speed, high-resolution closed-loop track-and-hold in a 0.18um SiGe BiCMOS technology. The architecture provides both high linearity and high speed, with 98.7dB and 89.4dB SNDR at 50MS/s and 100MS/s, respectively. As these specifications evolve to meet customer demands, new, high performance ADCs are needed. To this end, an efficient parallel ΔΣ ADC architecture has been designed that achieves high performance in digital processes, while also providing additional architecture flexibility. This ADC, consisting of four parallel ΔΣ ADCs and a single pipeline ADC provides high performance and reconfigurablity. This ADC is suited to applications requiring not only wide-bandwidth, high resolution signal conversion but an on-the-fly reconfigurable resolution and bandwidth.
Resource Type
Date Available
Date Copyright
Date Issued
Degree Level
Degree Name
Degree Field
Degree Grantor
Commencement Year
Advisor
Committee Member
Academic Affiliation
Non-Academic Affiliation
Keyword
Subject
Rights Statement
Language
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Linda Kathman(linda.kathman@oregonstate.edu) on 2009-03-11T11:55:00Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 phdthesis.pdf: 2866859 bytes, checksum: 213ac4efd8309da6ab111567a00402a4 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2009-03-11T11:55:00Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 phdthesis.pdf: 2866859 bytes, checksum: 213ac4efd8309da6ab111567a00402a4 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Robert Batten (battenr@onid.orst.edu) on 2009-01-07T04:55:30Z No. of bitstreams: 1 phdthesis.pdf: 2866859 bytes, checksum: 213ac4efd8309da6ab111567a00402a4 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Julie Kurtz(julie.kurtz@oregonstate.edu) on 2009-03-09T21:00:10Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 phdthesis.pdf: 2866859 bytes, checksum: 213ac4efd8309da6ab111567a00402a4 (MD5)

Relationships

Parents:

This work has no parents.

Items