The effect of the consumption of three types of dietary fish on cardiovascular risk predictors Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/z029p7387

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  • Epidemiological studies have suggested that the consumption of fish may reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. Compared to the number of studies using fish oils, few studies have used fish itself. Those which have used fish have generally used fattier fish such as mackerel and salmon as part of an uncontrolled diet. In this study, 23 healthy men consumed 200g each of Chinook salmon, Dover sole, and sablefish in a three-way crossover design for 18-day periods with three-week washout periods in between. The diets had the approximate composition of the 'Western' diet: 45% carbohydrates, 36% fat, and 16% protein with the sole diet containing 1.95 g omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids, the salmon diet 3.99 g n-3, and the sablefish diet 3.42 g n-3 fatty acids. Serum total cholesterol (TC), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), triglycerides (TG), bleeding time (BT), blood pressure (BP), platelet aggregation (PA) using ADP and collagen as agonists, platelet fatty acid profiles (FAP), thromboxane B2 (TXB2) , and apolipoprotein B (Apo B) were measured at the beginning and end of each period. TC, and HDL-C, and TG changed significantly when compared to the prefish diet while both LDL-C and apo B demonstrated diet effect. LDL-C increased on both the salmon and sablefish diets (p = 0.08) compared to the sole diet, and increased approximately 15% on the former two diets compared to the prefish diet. Bleeding time was significantly longer when the salmon diet was consumed (p = 0.06). The impact of the three diets on PA depended upon the agonist. With collagen, only the sablefish diet decreased aggregation compared to the prefish diet. When ADP was used, aggregation decreased on both the fattier fish diets compared to the low fat fish (sole). Similar results were demonstrated for TXB₂: the fattier fish produced statistically equivalent decreases (p = 0.06) among the diets, and lowered TXB₂ compared to the prefish diet. There were no significant differences among the diets for either systolic or diastolic BP though there was a significant decrease (p = 0.01) in diastolic pressure compared to the prefish diet when the salmon diet was consumed. Platelet fatty acid profiles reflected diet composition.
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