African-American folkloric form and function in segregated one-room schools Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/z029p929p

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  • Maintenance of one's self and one's people in a free society requires educational, cultural, and economic literacy. This is fully as imperative in a democracy as the maintenance of ignorance of slaves is required in an oppressive society. The requisite skills needed both to sustain one's self and become a contributor to one's society are learned from the home, school, and community. For the African-American, there have been many detours along the educational road. This study examined one aspect of teaching by African- American women whose classrooms were one-room, rural, segregated Southern schools in the early 1900's. The research questions were: (1) What is the West African Oral Tradition in Folklore? (2) Was there a transfer to and rebirth of that tradition among African slaves in the southern United States? (3) Were there any educational applications of a West African derived folkloric oral tradition by African-American female teachers in one-room, segregated schools in the rural South? The ethnographic research technique was used because it enabled the researcher to take a culture oriented approach based in anthropology. The informants were interviewed using an open-ended question format. Other sources were archival materials, newspapers, periodicals, books, records, and telephone contacts. This research was undertaken because of a personal interest by the researcher and the literature was devoid of any previous studies making the link between a West African Oral Tradition in Folklore, and African-American women teachers in rural, one-room, segregated Southern schools. This study is not predictive, but rather an ethnographic exploration to uncover the previously unstudied educational applications of a West African Folkloric Oral Tradition. Folklore was used in a significant way by the informants in their classes. In addition, this folklore had its roots in the African-American slave experience, thereby leading to the conclusion that it has a West African foundation. The similarities of motifs and usage demonstrate the links between the African-American and his West African ancestor.
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  • 1986
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-06-27T17:48:46Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 GrayPearlSpears1986.pdf: 1164625 bytes, checksum: 5f9cb993a57fd32455e8896337eb2016 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-06-26T16:09:19Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 GrayPearlSpears1986.pdf: 1164625 bytes, checksum: 5f9cb993a57fd32455e8896337eb2016 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Kim Stowell (ksscannerosu@gmail.com) on 2013-06-25T17:32:07Z No. of bitstreams: 1 GrayPearlSpears1986.pdf: 1164625 bytes, checksum: 5f9cb993a57fd32455e8896337eb2016 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2013-06-27T17:48:46Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 GrayPearlSpears1986.pdf: 1164625 bytes, checksum: 5f9cb993a57fd32455e8896337eb2016 (MD5) Previous issue date: 1985-09-06

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