Assigned variables associated with university sophomore housing choices Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/zg64tp81k

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  • The purpose of this study was twofold: first, to examine the choice of living setting of university sophomore women in relation to their value preferences and in relation to selected settings, socioeconomic background, and circumstance factors surrounding their choices. The secondary aim of the study was to investigate how the members of the various living groups perceive the value preferences of their immediate living group in relation to their own value preferences, and whether or not these perceptions correspond to the actual preferences expressed by their immediate living group. The data for this study came from two sources, the subjects' responses to the Allport-Vernon-Lindzey Study of Values, and a personal data sheet. The Study of Values was administered twice to each subject; the first time the subjects responded in light of their own value preferences and the second time they responded as they perceived the members of their immediate living group would respond. A stratified random sample of 21 female sophomores was drawn from each of two of the three major types of living settings on the Oregon State University campus, namely, the residence halls, cooperatives and sororities. In the third setting, the co-operatives, it was necessary to use the entire population of sophomores in order to achieve an equal number from all settings. The following hypotheses were tested: I. There is no difference among the three types of living groups with regard to the degree of preference expressed concerning each of six values. II. a) Choice of living setting is independent of setting characteristics. b) Choice of living setting is independent of socioeconomic characteristics. c) Choice of living setting is independent of selected circumstance characteristics. III. There is no relationship between an individual's score on each of six values and those scores for her specific group as perceived by her. IV. Perceived group value preferences do not differ from actual group value preferences on each of six values. An heirarchical analysis of variance was used to analyze the data for hypothesis one. There was insufficient evidence to reject the hypothesis of no difference among preferences expressed by members in three settings on each of the six values, with the exception of the aesthetic value. Co-operative members expressed aesthetic value preferences differently from those expressed by the residence hall and sorority members, which were highly similar to each other. In order to test hypothesis two, the chi-square test of independence was used. The significant results obtained indicate that choice of living setting is dependent upon the setting characteristics of proximity to campus, cost, atmosphere and prestige, size of group, mothers' education, family income, and amount of self-support. The choice of a living setting was independent of the influence of a significant other. Analysis of covariance was applied to the data for the test of hypothesis three; the correlation coefficients obtained were not significant, indicating that there is no reason to suspect that individuals perceive their living group's value preferences to be similar to their own. The test results for hypothesis four, tested by an heirarchical analysis of variance, indicated that subjects in the three settings perceive the economic, religious and political value preferences of their immediate living group inaccurately. However, there was not sufficient evidence to conclude that they did not perceive aesthetic, theoretical and social value preferences of their immediate living group accurately. These findings suggest that choice of living setting is a complex phenomenon dependent upon personal characteristics, setting characteristics, and contemporaneous circumstance variables which warrant further research design more stringent than the one employed in the present study.
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