Control of muscle protein degradation and steady-state poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase concentration by calpain Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/zk51vm170

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  • The first goal of this study was to understand the role of calpains in skeletal muscle protein degradation in cultured cells. We have developed a genetic approach to inhibit endogenous calpain activity through over-expressing dominant negative m-calpain (DN), antisense m-calpain (AS) and calpastatin inhibitory domain (CID). We observed that, under conditions of accelerated degradation (serum withdrawal), inhibition of m-calpain through DN-m-calpain over-expression caused a 30% inhibition of total protein degradation whereas CID over-expression reduced degradation by 63%. These constructs did not significantly affect degradation in the presence of serum. These data indicate that calpains participate in the accelerated degradation associated with serum withdrawal. Inhibition of calpain also stabilized nebulin, a major structural protein of the sarcomere. These observations indicate that calpains play significant roles in muscle protein turnover. Finally, over-expression of antisense m-calpain caused a transient reduction in m-calpain concentration after which normal m-calpain concentration was quickly re-established. These observations indicate that m-calpain is a short half-life protein in muscle cells. The second goal of this study is to investigate the role of calpain in the mediation of PARP protein level in differentiating myoblasts. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation, catalyzed by PARP, is involved in various physiological events, such as DNA excision repair, DNA recombination, DNA replication, cell differentiation, cell growth and transformation, and apoptosis. A protease participating in PARP turnover could be a significant regulator to the events which PARP is involved. A relationship between apoptosis and myofibrillar protein degradation via a common protease might suggest the basis for muscle wasting and atrophy which characterize in many muscle diseases. We established a genetic approach to inhibit endogenous calpain activity through over-expressing calpastatin inhibitory domain (CID). We observed that (1) inhibition of calpain activity increased PARP concentration when post-confluent myoblasts were cultured with 2% HS medium, an inducer of differentiation and (2) inhibition of calpain activity prevented PARP degradation induced by A23187 and etoposide in differentiating myoblasts. These data demonstrate that calpain is involved in regulation of PARP in cultured cells.
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  • description.provenance : Submitted by Erin Clark (ecscannerosu@gmail.com) on 2012-10-01T17:48:56Z No. of bitstreams: 1 HuangJing1998.pdf: 8386432 bytes, checksum: 43ea283dd58e35fb023092d3bd781bfe (MD5)
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  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2012-10-01T19:04:40Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 HuangJing1998.pdf: 8386432 bytes, checksum: 43ea283dd58e35fb023092d3bd781bfe (MD5)

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