The intrusion of logging debris into artificial gravel streambeds Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/zp38wf679

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  • The objective of this study was to quantitatively describe the intrusion of logging debris into artificial gravel streambeds during conditions of low stream flow with a stable streambed, and begin an analysis of the effect of high flow and unstable streambeds. This study was initiated because prior studies indicated that logging debris was responsible for dissolved oxygen reduction within the gravel bed of spawning streams. Low flow -- stable streambed studies were run for eighteen to twenty days in a flume. Two control samples of the gravel were taken. Logging slash was then placed on the gravel in volumes approximating those of logged streams. A sample was taken every other day for eighteen to twenty days using a device which froze a core of the streambed gravel. Since there were many problems with vandalism and weather, only two low flow replications were completed. shows the large random error which occurs even in the deeper sections. The range of debris concentrations of the two deeper sections for low flow studies one and two were .07 gm/l and .15 gm/l respectively. The average concentration values for low flow studies one and two were .03 gm/l and .02 gm/l respectively. No variables in the high flow study were found to be good predictors of intrusion. Natural random error and the extreme variability of this dynamic system were too great to draw even general conclusions. The range of concentrations of high flow studies one and two were .14 gm/l and .04 gm/l respectively. The average concentration values for high flow studies one and two were .01 gm/l and .02 gm/l respectively. Beneath the armour layer, the streambed exhibits less variability, but the large random error is sufficient to make prediction of intrusion difficult. During high flow periods where the streambed is moving, no predictive equation could be developed to estimate organic material release or incorporation owing to the large variability existing in the system.
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