The relationship between the gut and the water-electrolyte balance of a marine teleost, Enophrys bison (Girard) Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/zw12z762d

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract or Summary
  • In higher vertebrates, normal digestion and absorption by the gastrointestinal tract are dependent on the orderly and controlled transit of intraluminal contents. A relationship between fluid passage through the gut and absorption from the gut has yet to be examined in fish. In marine teleosts, the osmolality and ion concentration of the ingested seawater (SW) must be lowered before water absorption is initiated. By assuming that these processes are related to fluid transit, it is likely that alterations in these processes as well as in the water-electrolyte balance (WEB) of the animal would result with changes in the transit of intraluminal fluid. I hypothesized that marine teleosts regulate gut motility to achieve essential water absorption and thereby maintain the WEB. To test this, the gut of a marine teleost, the buffalo sculpin (Enophrys bison G.), was challenged in situ with forced drinking (continuous perfusion) at rates above and below that of the measured drinking rate (DR). Initially, the sensitivity of the WEB of the sculpin to preparatory manipulations that were essential for testing the above proposal was determined. The WEB was monitored before, during and after manipulation that included handling, containment, benzocaine-induced anesthesia, arterial and esophageal cannulation and serial sampling of blood. To monitor the WEB, indicators of the osmotic status and the intravascular volume were measured. Within one to three hours after surgery, a hyper-osmotic hemodilution resulted from an influx of hyper-osmotic fluid. Blood volume increased about 18% after surgery. The osmotic imbalance was corrected within 24 hours after surgery, whereas, the volume disturbance persisted. The occurrence of plasma hyper-osmolality after surgery was inhibited with esophageal occlusion. This implicated the gut as the origin of the osmotic and volume disturbances. Further data evaluation suggested that the surgery-induced WEB disturbance was a resultant of enhanced ion and water absorption in the upper and lower gut. Next, the DR and drinking behavior of the buffalo sculpin were determined. Also assessed was the influence of the manner of SW ingestion (ab libitum drinking or forced drinking) and of the rate of ingestion on SW modification by the gut. DR was variable within as well as among experimental groups. DR appeared to increase with the animal's capture duration suggesting that water permeability of the sculpin was gradually increasing after capture. The fluid volume and resident duration, and water modification in the upper gut and lower gut were consistent over a broad range of DRs. This demonstrated that the sculpin were ingesting SW frequently, perhaps in a manner similar to sipping. In respect to estimates made in sculpin allowed to drink ab libitum, forced drinking had a negative effect on desalting. Finally, a relationship was looked for between gut motility and the WEB of the sculpin. Several indicators of gut motility, water absorption, and the WEB were monitored while the gut was perfused at several different rates. If gut motility is regulated to achieve essential water absorption, then changes in gut motility would result in response to alterations in the forced drinking rate, so that adequate water modification and absorption would be accomplished and the WEB maintained. Over the levels of perfusion administered, the WEB was not maintained. With the elevation in perfusion rate, the intravascular volume increased and yet intestinal water absorption was maintained or gradually increased. It appears that under the circumstance of enhanced SW ingestion, the mechanisms regulating gut motility and water absorption are not integrated with mechanisms maintaining the WEB of the buffalo sculpin. It remains unclear if, without SW ingestion, gut motility and the WEB are actively related.
Resource Type
Date Available
Date Copyright
Date Issued
Degree Level
Degree Name
Degree Field
Degree Grantor
Commencement Year
Advisor
Committee Member
Academic Affiliation
Non-Academic Affiliation
Subject
Rights Statement
Peer Reviewed
Language
Digitization Specifications
  • File scanned at 300 ppi (Monochrome) using Capture Perfect 3.0 on a Canon DR-9050C in PDF format. CVista PdfCompressor 4.0 was used for pdf compression and textual OCR.
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-02-25T22:19:30Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 SleetRandolphBullock1982.pdf: 5409208 bytes, checksum: 91faafe4e7e079201b6d01071063f587 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-02-25T22:17:44Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 SleetRandolphBullock1982.pdf: 5409208 bytes, checksum: 91faafe4e7e079201b6d01071063f587 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Kirsten Clark (kcscannerosu@gmail.com) on 2013-02-25T21:17:16Z No. of bitstreams: 1 SleetRandolphBullock1982.pdf: 5409208 bytes, checksum: 91faafe4e7e079201b6d01071063f587 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2013-02-25T22:19:30Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 SleetRandolphBullock1982.pdf: 5409208 bytes, checksum: 91faafe4e7e079201b6d01071063f587 (MD5) Previous issue date: 1981-06-15

Relationships

Parents:

This work has no parents.

Last modified

Downloadable Content

Download PDF

Items